Star Wars actress Carrie Fisher hits back at body shaming and ageist criticism after The Force Awakens appearance

'Unfortunately it hurts all 3 of my feelings'

Carrie Fisher has hit out at those scrutinising her appearance and debating whether she has aged well in the wake of the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

The 59-year-old made a much-anticipated return as Princess Leia to the latest instalment, which has broken records across the world.

However, despite the rave reviews and near-hysteria that the film has brought, Fisher was forced to defend herself on social media amid the constant scrutiny of her appearance in The Force Awakens.

Addressing her followers on Twitter, she pleaded with viewers to stop debating her appearance.

“Please stop debating about whether or not I have aged well. Unfortunately it hurts all 3 of my feelings. My body hasn’t aged as well as I have. Blow us.”

She continued to share a photo of her dog, Gary – who has accompanied Fisher on the red carpet several times on the promotional trail for The Force Awakens– alongside another statement which said: “My body is my brain bag, it hauls me around to those places and in front of faces where there’s something to say or see.”

After re-tweeting some of the negative criticism she’d received, the actress shared some words of wisdom: “Youth and beauty are not accomplishments, they’re the temporary happy.”

Fisher also re-tweeted a few statements of support from fans, including one who compared the scrutiny Fisher receives in comparison to her male co-stars such as Harrison Ford and Mark Hamill.

Another user of the social media site suggested: “Men don’t age better than women, they’re just allowed to age,” a sentiment Fisher shared by re-tweeting it to her 793,000 followers.

Fisher appeared in the first Star Wars film, A New Hope in 1977, other notable film appearances include The Blues Brothers and When Harry Met Sally.

Earlier this month Fisher told Good Housekeeping magazine that she had to lose weight for The Force Awakens and that in the 38-years since the first film not much has changed in terms of Hollywood’s beauty standards.

“They don’t want to hire all of me – only about three-quarters! Nothing changes, it’s an appearance-driven thing. I’m in a business where the only thing that matters is weight and appearance. That is so messed up. They might as well say get younger, because that’s how easy it is.”