What the web knows about you

Think you lead a private life? The internet is making that impossible. Danny Bradbury discovers how much of our personal details are now public knowledge

Have you ever Googled your own name? You might be surprised to see what information the internet holds about you. It's fun to relive career highlights and low-points from years ago, or find embarrassing shots of yourself posing for a team photo with the Sunday League football side you used to play for. The practice even has a cute name, "vanity searching".

But there's a flip side: if you can use the web to dig into your own history, then so can other people. And it's not just meddling friends or potential dates who may be tapping your name into search engines - employers are starting to use the trick, too. Suddenly, it doesn't seem so funny that a friend's MySpace page shows a photograph of you wearing a fluffy red wig and huge shades, flat-out drunk at the office Christmas party. And if you're trying to win a promotion at a law firm, you might come to regret every outré newsgroup post you made at university.

That's why online services are hoping to take care of the problem for you. ReputationDefender, a US-based company, has launched a service to monitor online information about anyone who signs up for their service. If it finds anything embarrassing, it will ask web hosts to take down the information - though it remains to be seen how many of them will comply. The site, which will also check to find out what your children are saying about themselves online, regularly searches the web and focuses on social networking, blogging, and photo-sharing sites.

But your reputation isn't the only thing that you need to protect online. From cyberstalkers to identity thieves, all kinds of people can find out all about you, and potentially wreak havoc with the results.

"The internet is a fantastic place for people to be, to buy, to shop - and to get information. But in today's society, your identity is the most precious thing you will ever have, and once you lose it, it could be lost forever," says Tony Neate, managing director of the Government initiative Get Safe Online, who also worked at the National High-Tech Crime Unit until its absorption into the Serious Organised Crime Agency earlier this year. "You have to take steps online to secure your identity."

We all know the dangers of identity theft - debts accrued in your name can wreak havoc, preventing you getting a mortgage, and your bank account can be targeted. But who knows what some people may do if they can build an extensive profile of you - it has never been so easy to acquire the information, so we can't know yet how it will be used.

How could someone go about snooping on you? Even if you have an ex-directory telephone number, the electoral roll will hold your details by default, unless you specifically choose not to be listed. "If you leave your information on it, your name, date of birth and home address are immediately available," warns Tom Ilube of Garlik, an identity protection service. Not only that, but the names of the people sharing the address will be available, too.

Garlik offers a privacy protection service called DataPatrol, which launched at the start of the month. It searches online for the personal information that could affect your privacy and scours data sources including credit reports, records at Companies House and the Land Registry, alongside more everyday search engines, monitoring for any changes.

Databases such as these can reveal extensive information about you to anyone who has your postcode. Websites such as nethouseprices.com and houseprices.co.uk will let people know what you paid for your house if they tap in your address. Correlate that against the electoral roll information about who lives there and you can begin building a rudimentary economic profile, one private investigator, who wishes to remain nameless, tells The Independent. "You can find out how much they earn because they will probably be sharing the mortgage," he says.

Local council planning permission databases can be another source of information. Some councils put scanned application forms online, displaying everything from detailed house plans to homeowner signatures. And if you have ever been a company director, a quick search of the Companies House database will yield your name, date of birth and address, along with other companies that you have directed, and your previous business partners.

Some services aggregate many of these online searches into one place - 192.com charges for such searches, gathering information from the electoral roll, the telephone database, and Companies House. It will even find information about a person's neighbours. Birth data online will often list the subject's mother's maiden name - a common security question asked by telephone banking services and other institutions.

Such information can be combined with postcode-searchable databases from the Office of National Statistics that provide extensive demographic information about the area surrounding a particular postcode. This provides online sleuths with useful data about everything from educational standards through to healthcare, economic deprivation and local crime statistics, not to mention census data. And so it continues. Every new piece of information can then be tapped into a search engine such as Google to reveal even more information.

Alongside the more traditional databases, social networking sites present a new hunting ground for personal data. To some, they are more than just a source of embarrassing pictures - they can also present a profound privacy risk, warns Simon Davies, director of the privacy advocacy group Privacy International. These sites, such as MySpace, its UK equivalent Bebo, and others such as Facebook, thrive on people's willingness to make connections with each other and post personal information.

"I think people on social networking sites sometimes suspend reality," Davies says. "They do things by impulse, they enter data unintentionally, they build friendships easily and without due care." Davies points to several examples of MySpace users posting pictures and information about themselves and their partners, along with friends posting birthday wishes - and therefore revealing birth dates, another common security question for phone-banking.

No wonder that privacy advisors like Privacy International's Davies and Garlik are urging people to be more careful online. So what can you do? The website of Get Safe Online has guidelines, and you could sign up for services from Garlik or ReputationDefender. But perhaps we should all start by taking more of an interest in what the internet knows about us - the websites (see box) will give you an insight, and there's nothing stopping you from asking companies, out of goodwill, to remove your details. After all, thanks to the internet, your life may well be an open book to those committed enough to read it.

www.getsafeonline.org; www.reputationdefender.com; www.garlik.com

How exposed are you?

If you want to dig deeper than Google and find out what the internet really knows about you, try these web sites.

www.192.com - gathers information from many different resources

www.1837online.com - records of births, marriages and death

www.houseprices.co.uk - house price information, by postcode

www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk - local information

www.ukplanning.com - planning information, searchable by postcode

www.gigateway.org.uk/areasearch/default.html - detailed local civic information

www.postcodeanywhere.co.uk - postcode finder

www.elooker.co.uk/phonesearch.asp - reverse number directory

www.companieshouse.gov.uk - search for companies and directors

www.google.co.uk - everything

maps.google.co.uk - geographic information

www.zoominfo.com - collected information about peoples' careers

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Life and Style
love + sex A new study has revealed the average size - but does that leave men outside the 'normal' range being thought of as 'abnormal'?
Voices
The Palace of Westminster is falling down, according to John Bercow
voices..says Matthew Norman
Sport
Steve Bruce and Gus Poyet clash
football
Arts and Entertainment
Jake and Dinos Chapman were motivated by revenge to make 'Bring me the Head of Franco Toselli! '
arts + ents Shapero Modern Gallery to show explicit Chapman Brothers film
Arts and Entertainment
Kurt Cobain performing for 'MTV Unplugged' in New York, shortly before his death
music Brett Morgen's 'Cobain: Montage of Heck' debunks many of the myths surrounding the enigmatic singer
Sport
Brendan Rodgers
football The Liverpool manager will be the first option after Pep Guardiola
Life and Style
life
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Sport
Christian Benteke of Aston Villa celebrates scoring the winner for Aston Villa
football
Arts and Entertainment
Myanna Buring, Julian Rhind-Tutt and Russell Tovey in 'Banished'
TV Jimmy McGovern tackles 18th-century crime and punishment
Arts and Entertainment
Paul Whitehouse as Herbert
arts + ents
News
Bill O'Reilly attends The Hollywood Reporter 35 Most Powerful People In Media Celebration at The Four Seasons Restaurant on April 16, 2014 in New York City
media It is the second time he and the channel have clarified statements
News
people
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Lettings and Sales Negotiator - OTE £46,000

£16000 - £46000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an opportunity to join ...

Recruitment Genius: Home Care Worker - Reading and Surrounding Areas

£9 - £13 per hour: Recruitment Genius: This is a great opportunity to join a s...

Recruitment Genius: Key Sales Account Manager - OTE £35,000

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Have you got a proven track rec...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive - OTE £40,000

£15000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is a great opportunity for...

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn