Asyraf Haziq: 'Mugging unlikely in Malaysia'

A Malaysian student mugged by yobs posing as Good Samaritans during the London riots has expressed doubt as to whether the incident would have happened in his country.

Asyraf Haziq described Malaysia as "well-organised" and said police there did their job "more efficiently".



But he insisted he had faith in the British justice system, while showing no desire to see his assailants dealt with harshly.



Reece Donovan, who police say is in his early 20s, of Chadwell Heath, Romford, Essex, is accused of robbing him and will appear at Wood Green Crown Court today for a plea and case management hearing.



Addressing a press conference with his family at a west London hotel last night, his alleged victim spoke warmly of the UK, saying there were "a lot of good people everywhere you go".



Mr Haziq, 20, was taken to hospital with a broken jaw after being set upon less than a month after arriving in Britain.



He was robbed by hooded youths who initially pretended to help him before rifling through his rucksack, stealing his mobile phone, portable Sony PlayStation and wallet in Barking, east London, last Monday.



Asked whether such an incident was likely to have happened to him in Malaysia, he was doubtful.



"Our country is well-organised and the police do their job more efficiently," he said.



Sympathetic members of the public donated thousands of pounds to a fund for him after footage of the attack was posted on YouTube.



But the student indicated he intended to give at least some of it away.



He said: "I think there's a lot of other victims that need help as well."



His mother, Maznah Abu Mansor, 47, and father, Rossli Harun, 49, thanked the British Government, media and "all those who were involved" for their help and support over the past days.



The couple, who flew to London from their home in the Malaysian state of Selangor at the weekend, said in a statement: "We sincerely hope that this kind of demonstration would not happen again in the streets of the UK for the sake of everyone's safety, and that such positive human values shown during the course of this event would continue all the time."



Ms Abu Mansor, a teacher, said she had been stunned when she heard of her son's attack, adding that she had viewed London as a safe place.



"Of course I was very shocked and so sad to hear it," she said.



Asked what he liked about Britain, where he plans to study accountancy at north London's Kaplan International College for two years, her son named the weather, the halal food and the mix of nationalities.



"I'm just happy being here," he said. "The very first moment I came here I was very excited. I'm really thankful."



Source: PA

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