Computer game gun sparks armed siege in Liverpool

 

A toy gun meant for computer game shoot-'em-ups has sparked an armed siege on a residential street.

Armed police officers surrounded a house in Spellow Lane, Walton, Liverpool, after a passer-by dialled 999, claiming that a man was wielding a firearm from the window.

After a short stand-off, officers detained the suspect - only to discover that his weapon was a plastic games console gun.

A police spokeswoman said: "Merseyside Police takes all reports of gun crime seriously and if, as in this case, a member of the public reports that they believe someone is armed with a firearm and is pointing it from a window, officers will respond.

"In this instance, once officers gained entry to the property, they found that the imitation firearm was, in fact, from a computer console.

"The computer console was not in use at the time this was reported to us."

The police spokeswoman said that after a short investigation, the person with the gun was "given suitable advice" and no further criminal action was taken.

She added: "Merseyside Police would like to remind people that even imitation firearms, including toys, have the potential to cause fear of violence and intimidation and they should be mindful of this when using such items.

"There is also the potential that members of the public could face being confronted with armed officers by not using such items sensibly and with regard for others."

PA

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