Convicted killer filmed 'passing lie detector test'

Luke Mitchell hopes Youtube video will clear him of teen's murder

The convicted murderer of a Scottish schoolgirl has become the first prisoner to post a video on YouTube showing him apparently passing a lie detector test to prove his innocence.

Luke Mitchell was given permission by prison officials to release a 16-minute film, in which he denies killing his 14-year-old girlfriend Jodi Jones in 2003. The 24-year-old, who is serving a life sentence at Shotts Prison in Lanarkshire, Scotland, has consistently denied the murder.

In the footage filmed last April, he is seen being questioned by an independent expert, Terry Mulllins, secretary of the British Polygraph Association. When asked: "Were you present when Jodi was stabbed?", he replies "No". And when questioned: "Did you stab Jodi on 30 June, 2003?" he again replies "No" – and further denies knowing for certain where her body would be found.

During the interview process, which took two-and-a-half hours in its entirety, Mr Mullins also asks Mitchell a series of "comparison" questions to help him assess the truthfulness of his responses to the three key questions.

It is understood that Mitchell hopes releasing the clip on YouTube will help persuade the public he was wrongly convicted. The film, which was posted online on Saturday, is believed to be the first time a convicted British prisoner has been seen taking and passing a polygraph test while in jail.

Mitchell's mother Corrine spoke of her happiness at the public being able to see her son apparently proving his innocence. "He says he has never had anything to hide so he didn't hesitate when he had the chance to take it," she said. "Luke told me he believes the test is a crucial indication of his innocence to go along with other issues, such as the lack of forensic evidence linking him to the crime."

Mrs Mitchell is also reported to have passed her own lie detector test supporting her story that her son was at home at the time of the killing.

Schoolgirl Jodi was found dead on a remote path with her throat slashed and cuts to her eyelids, right cheek, left breast, abdomen and right forearm.

She had been on her way to meet Mitchell, who was also just 14 at the time, shortly before the killing.

Her body was later found by him near his home in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

During his trial, the prosecution said only someone with "guilty knowledge" could have found her so quickly at night in poor search conditions, but Mitchell insisted his dog led him to her body.

Mitchell's case is currently being reviewed by the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, which investigates potential miscarriages of justice and can recommend new appeals.

Currently polygraph tests are inadmissible in Scottish courts, but a report on Mitchell passing the lie detector has been included in his submission to the commission.

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