Convicted killer filmed 'passing lie detector test'

Luke Mitchell hopes Youtube video will clear him of teen's murder

The convicted murderer of a Scottish schoolgirl has become the first prisoner to post a video on YouTube showing him apparently passing a lie detector test to prove his innocence.

Luke Mitchell was given permission by prison officials to release a 16-minute film, in which he denies killing his 14-year-old girlfriend Jodi Jones in 2003. The 24-year-old, who is serving a life sentence at Shotts Prison in Lanarkshire, Scotland, has consistently denied the murder.

In the footage filmed last April, he is seen being questioned by an independent expert, Terry Mulllins, secretary of the British Polygraph Association. When asked: "Were you present when Jodi was stabbed?", he replies "No". And when questioned: "Did you stab Jodi on 30 June, 2003?" he again replies "No" – and further denies knowing for certain where her body would be found.

During the interview process, which took two-and-a-half hours in its entirety, Mr Mullins also asks Mitchell a series of "comparison" questions to help him assess the truthfulness of his responses to the three key questions.

It is understood that Mitchell hopes releasing the clip on YouTube will help persuade the public he was wrongly convicted. The film, which was posted online on Saturday, is believed to be the first time a convicted British prisoner has been seen taking and passing a polygraph test while in jail.

Mitchell's mother Corrine spoke of her happiness at the public being able to see her son apparently proving his innocence. "He says he has never had anything to hide so he didn't hesitate when he had the chance to take it," she said. "Luke told me he believes the test is a crucial indication of his innocence to go along with other issues, such as the lack of forensic evidence linking him to the crime."

Mrs Mitchell is also reported to have passed her own lie detector test supporting her story that her son was at home at the time of the killing.

Schoolgirl Jodi was found dead on a remote path with her throat slashed and cuts to her eyelids, right cheek, left breast, abdomen and right forearm.

She had been on her way to meet Mitchell, who was also just 14 at the time, shortly before the killing.

Her body was later found by him near his home in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

During his trial, the prosecution said only someone with "guilty knowledge" could have found her so quickly at night in poor search conditions, but Mitchell insisted his dog led him to her body.

Mitchell's case is currently being reviewed by the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, which investigates potential miscarriages of justice and can recommend new appeals.

Currently polygraph tests are inadmissible in Scottish courts, but a report on Mitchell passing the lie detector has been included in his submission to the commission.

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Arts and Entertainment
Cassetteboy's latest video is called Emperor's New Clothes rap
videoThe political parody genius duo strike again with new video
Sport
Seth Rollins cashes in his Money in the Bank contract to win the WWE World Heavyweight Championship
WWERollins wins the WWE World Heavyweight title in one of the greatest WrestleMania's ever seen
News
news
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
tvPoldark, TV review
News
(David Sandison)
newsHow living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor