DJ Delroy Catwell jailed for murdering girlfriend’s daughter because she was getting more attention than him

 

A DJ who murdered his girlfriend's "outgoing, chatty" three-year-old daughter when he was supposed to be looking after her was sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum term of 20 years today.

Delroy Catwell was told by Mrs Justice Nicola Davies: "It is difficult to conceive of a greater abuse of trust than that which you perpetrated in killing this vulnerable and defenceless young girl."

Catwell, 31, denied murdering Lylah Aaron but was found guilty by a jury at Sheffield Crown Court yesterday.

During a two-week trial, the court heard how Catwell, Lylah and the girl's mother Precious Chibanda shared a house in Beck Road, in the Shiregreen area of Sheffield.

On February 8, Catwell was left in charge of Lylah as her mother went to work at Derby Royal Infirmary as a trainee nurse.

The court heard how her mother returned later to find her daughter in bed and only later realised she was unconscious. She had suffered serious head injuries and died later in hospital.

Experts said Lylah suffered a brain injury consistent with being hit by a hard object. The post-mortem examination revealed her injuries were caused by "repeated impacts to her face and skull".

It also found bruises on her body consistent with being punched, kicked and slapped, and she had three broken ribs.

The examination showed she had been attacked before.

The jury heard how Catwell had complained about being sidelined as his girlfriend gave more attention to her daughter.

He described Lylah as demanding and clingy with her mother, taking time away from his relationship with his partner.

When Catwell gave evidence he tried to blame Ms Chibanda for attacking her daughter.

The judge said Lylah, who was aged three years and four months, was "an engaging, outgoing, chatty child".

She added: "On the previous day she had attended nursery. CCTV footage showed her running into nursery, seemingly without a care in the world.

"Lylah was in your care because her mother, Precious, was pursuing her chosen career as a nurse. Precious was studying at university and working at a placement in a hospital in order to build a life for herself and her daughter. It was her trust in you which permitted Precious to leave her much-loved and only daughter in your care. It is difficult to conceive of a greater abuse of trust than that which you perpetrated in killing this vulnerable and defenceless young girl."

Ms Chibanda left home at 5.30 that morning. Lylah was to go to nursery, it was "pyjama day" and Ms Chibanda left out pyjamas for Lylah to wear.

The judge told Catwell: "At 2.30 that afternoon you telephoned Precious to tell her that Lylah was unwell, she seemed tired and did not want to go to nursery, she wanted to sleep. As a result you had not taken her to nursery. Precious told you to let Lylah sleep. Unbeknown to Precious, at around midday you inflicted the injuries upon Lylah which were causative of her death.

"When Precious returned home at about 4 to 4.30 she went to see Lylah, who appeared to be asleep. Evidence has been given that an unconscious child would give the appearance of a sleeping child. Precious subsequently checked up on Lylah and shortly before 6pm attempted to wake Lylah only to find her to be unresponsive.

"Within 30 minutes, Lylah was at hospital where the full nature and extent of her injuries was discovered. Some six hours later, she was pronounced dead, her presenting injuries being deemed unsurvivable."

She had suffered multiple blows to the head, either from fists, feet, a blunt object or by the propelling of her head against such an object or a combination of both.

These impacts to her head caused a fatal haemorrhage and brain swelling. Bruising was also found on her body, in particular, to the bowel, this being caused by a heavy impact to her stomach. Four recent fractures of three ribs were present. These were considered to have been caused by squeezing.

The judge said it was undisputed that Catwell must have been the person responsible for earlier injuries inflicted three to five weeks before Lylah's death.

She added: "The injuries sustained by Lylah on the 8th February to her head, ribs and abdomen would have required considerable force.

"This slight child would have been wholly defenceless in the face of such a sustained assault. Compounding your actions, you allowed Lylah, who would have drifted into an unconscious state, to remain at home.

"You made no attempt to call for medical aid. For a matter of hours you knew that within the house was a badly injured young girl for whom you were responsible.

"You took no steps to alert any person to the need for help. On the contrary, the story which you gave Precious at 2.30 was intended to, and did, provide her with a false account of what had occurred such as to allay any concerns on her part."

She approached the sentence on the basis that it was a loss of temper which led to the assault, and also the earlier one, she said.

PA

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen