Exclusive: Secret internal police report points to ‘highly corrupt’ cells in the Met

Three former Scotland Yard detectives seized drugs from criminals and sold them on

Three former Scotland Yard detectives were part of “highly corrupt cells within the Metropolitan Police Service” but have never been brought to justice, according to a secret internal report seen by The Independent.

The police officers, who left the Met to open a private investigation agency, were suspected of seizing tens of thousands of ecstasy tablets from criminals and selling the drugs themselves, according to a file produced by the force’s anti-corruption command.

The 2000 report said the officers also had links to London’s criminal underworld and were capable of tracking down and threatening witnesses involved in sensitive trials.

Despite the damning statements of fact in its internal file, Scotland Yard yesterday confirmed that none of the three ex-detectives have ever been successfully prosecuted.

The news will add to fears that the Metropolitan Police is unable – or unwilling – to tackle criminality in its ranks and follows a series of troubling scandals involving the tainted murder investigations of Stephen Lawrence and Daniel Morgan, revelations around the exploits of its rogue undercover police officers, and the fitting-up at the Downing Street gates of former Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell.

Keith Vaz, chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee, said: “The Committee will be concerned by yet another piece of evidence which may point to further allegations of corruption in the Met. The police exist to remove drugs from our streets not to sell them.”

Mr Vaz also indicated the Home Affairs Select Committee is to investigate the thorny subject of police corruption after the parliamentary summer break, during a separate inquiry into organised crime. He said: “The Committee will wish to hear more on these issues as it looks into organised crime later in the year.”

The report, produced by the Met’s Directorate of Professional Standards 14 years ago, said the three former police officers were part of “highly organised and corrupt cells” within the Met.

It adds: “Over the years they have established numerous contacts within the Service and with outside agencies as well as amongst the criminal fraternity.

“The activities of the ex-officers in their capacity as private investigators will doubtless have increased the number of intelligence options available to them.”

The report also states the ex-detectives may try to frustrate an upcoming trial and trigger “negative publicity” which could have an “adverse effect upon the reputation of the Metropolitan Police Service”.

One of the suspected corrupt detectives was described as “highly experienced in police covert and surveillance and operational techniques as well as the use and handling of criminal informants”.

The report warns that two of the three suspected police officers “will resort to physical or psychological intimidation of the witnesses either directly or indirectly”.

In January, The Independent revealed the existence of Operation Tiberius, a secret police report written in 2002 that concluded there was “endemic corruption” inside the Metropolitan Police.

The file found organised crime networks in north-east London were able to infiltrate the Met “at will” to frustrate the criminal justice system.

Tiberius found organised crime syndicates had bribed scores of former and then-serving detectives in order to access confidential databases, obtain live intelligence on criminal investigations, provide specialist knowledge of surveillance, technical deployment and undercover techniques to help to evade prosecution; and take part in criminal acts such as mass drug importation and money laundering. Research suggests that only a tiny number have been convicted.

News
ebooksNow available in paperback
Sport
Dwight Gayle (left) celebrates making it 1-1 with Crystal Palace captain Mile Jedinak
premier leagueReds falter to humbling defeat
Sport
Harry Kane
premier leagueLive minute-by-minute coverage
News
video
Arts and Entertainment
Jerry Hall (Hand out press photograph provided by jackstanley@theambassadors.com)
theatre
News
peopleFormer civil rights activist who was jailed for smoking crack cocaine has died aged 78
Arts and Entertainment
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Damien Hirst
artCoalition's anti-culture policy and cuts in local authority spending to blame, says academic
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Kirk Cameron is begging his Facebook fans to give him positive reviews
film
Arts and Entertainment
Jason goes on a special mission for the queen
tvReview: Everyone loves a CGI Cyclops and the BBC's Saturday night charmer is getting epic
Sport
Jonny May scores for England
rugby unionEngland 28 Samoa 9: Wing scores twice to help England record their first win in six
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible
Look what's mushrooming now! Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector

Look what's mushrooming now!

Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector
Neil Findlay is more a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

More a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

The vilification of the potential Scottish Labour leader Neil Findlay shows how one-note politics is today, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Tenderstem broccoli omelette; Fried eggs with Mexican-style tomato and chilli sauce; Pan-fried cavolo nero with soft-boiled egg

Oeuf quake

Bill Granger's cracking egg recipes
Terry Venables: Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back

Terry Venables column

Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back
Michael Calvin: Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Those at the top are allowing the same issues to go unchallenged, says Michael Calvin