Most racial discrimination investigations into police officers result in no action

Of the 1,043 cases of alleged racial discrimination, 816 did not result in action

Eight in 10 investigations into alleged racial discrimination by police officers result in no further action being taken, figures released by a watchdog show today.

The figures – detailed in an inspection report into police integrity – showed that of the 1,043 cases of alleged racial discrimination by police investigated in the 12 months to March last year, only resulted in six people being sacked, while 816 did not result in any action taken.

“We’re concerned about that,” said Mike Cunningham, who headed the inspection. “I think the public would be concerned about that, which is why we have signalled that more work is required for the forces to explain why that’s the case.”

The report said that while improvements had been made in tackling corruption, it said that more than half of police forces are not actively pursuing intelligence about potential corruption.

An assessment of the threat posed by corruption in 2013 by the now scrapped Serious Organised Crime Agency raised concerns about corruption for the purposes of sexual gratification, and of the increased use of class A and B drugs by officers.

Only just more than half of forces use random drug testing in part because of concerns at the cost for cash-strapped forces, said Mr Cunningham.