Riots to cost Met police £34m

Scotland Yard is expected to have spent more on policing the riots than it spent on policing all major public order events in the capital last year, officials said today.



The disturbances will cost the force more than £34 million, with the total expected to rise even further as the final bills from other forces called in to help is settled, the Metropolitan Police Authority (MPA) said.



This compares with a total of £34.8 million spent by Scotland Yard on policing 42 major public order events between April 2010 and March 2011, figures showed.



An MPA spokesman said: "The Metropolitan Police Authority expects at this stage that a figure in excess of £34 million is expected for policing the recent disturbances in London."







In comparison, policing the student fees protests in London cost Scotland Yard £7.5 million, while another £2.1 million was spent providing security at the TUC anti-cuts demonstration in March, £1.9 million on the Pope's visit to Britain, and £2.2 million around last year's general election campaign.







The figures were revealed as one chief constable said the rapid and robust justice dispensed in the wake of the riots has helped take the momentum out of the disorder.



Tim Hollis, the head of Humberside Police who was drafted in to help earlier this month, added that the swift action by the courts over the looting and violence raised questions over why cases usually take so long.



His comments came as magistrates rejected accusations from the leader of Britain's prison governors that there has been a "feeding frenzy" in sentencing after the recent riots.



Writing in the Yorkshire Post, Mr Hollis said: "We witnessed an unusual but very welcome degree of co-operation and support from our partners in the criminal justice system.



"We really did see rapid and robust justice with offenders being arrested, charged, put before the courts and sentenced in days.



"This undoubtedly contributed to taking the momentum out of the disorder - but for the police and public it did raise the question as to why cases take so long to get to court in the normal course of events."



He also questioned "why imprisonment is not used more effectively at an early stage for those who make the lives of the law-abiding a misery on a more routine basis".



But Eoin McLennan-Murray, president of the Prison Governors Association (PGA), claimed over the weekend that magistrates had lost all sense of proportion.



"It's like when you've got sharks and there's blood in the water and it's a feeding frenzy," he told The Independent on Sunday.



"There's a sentencing frenzy and we seem to have lost all sight of proportionality.



"It's appealing to the populist mentality, and that's not the best basis on which to sentence people. The norms of sentencing are being ignored."



But Magistrates' Association chairman John Thornhill said the claims were "unreasonable and unfounded", adding that it was "just not the case" that normal sentencing was being ignored.

PA

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before