Stephen Lawrence brother Stuart receives racist threat after police complaint

 

The brother of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence has received a racist threat after publicity surrounding his complaint that police had stopped him up to 25 times.

A message sent to the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust was the first time that Stuart has been targeted directly in the 20 years since his brother died, his lawyer Imran Khan said.

The letter or document, received by the trust on January 16, has now been passed to the police.

Mr Khan said: "He has never received any threat before this time. He has kept pretty much in the background. I can only assume that this was a result of the publicity that had appeared directly prior.

"The vast majority of communications are positive and from well wishers. There are a very few that might say anything untoward, and most are directed at the Trust rather than individuals.

"There have been a few occasions that somebody has written something nasty or made a threat, and we take every single one of them seriously and they are all reported."

Scotland Yard confirmed it is investigating the racist threat.

A spokeswoman said: "Police are investigating an allegation of racially aggravated malicious communication, reported to officers on Wednesday, January 16. This is after correspondence was received at an address in Deptford."

Earlier this month Mr Lawrence, 35, told the Daily Mail that he believes he has been repeatedly stopped by police because he is black.

He told the newspaper: "I am being targeted because of the colour of my skin, I don't think it's because I am Stephen's brother.

"Whenever I have been stopped, I have never subsequently been charged with anything, and nothing has ever been found to be wrong with my car."

Mr Lawrence has made an official complaint to Scotland Yard about his treatment.

His mother Doreen Lawrence told the BBC programme HARDtalk: "In the early days our car was always attacked, and we get letters sent to the Trust about me, and recently there's one come through because Stuart has made a stand.

"People out there are still very angry, just the name of Stephen brings their anger."

She told the broadcaster that she has warned her surviving son to be careful.

"I said to him yesterday he's got to be very careful when he's out and I'm always worried about me being out, so I try not be out too late travelling home and stuff.

"The fear is always there."

PA

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