Stuart Hall's 'inadequate' jail sentence for sex offences doubled by Court of Appeal

BBC broadcaster's original 15-month prison term for sex offences criticised as 'unduly lenient'

Veteran broadcaster Stuart Hall's prison sentence for indecently assaulting 13 girls was doubled to 30 months today after the Appeal Court ruled that the punishment was inadequate for the crimes that he had committed.

The disgraced former presenter of 'It's a Knockout' was told by Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge that he had "got away with it" for decades that he had committed over 18 years from 1968 and lived a lie for more than half of his life.

Hall, 83, who earlier this year admitted 14 counts of indecent assault against young girls as young as nine, kept his head bowed as he listened to proceedings via videolink from Preston prison and showed no reaction as the decision was announced.

Today's hearing followed 165 complaints about the length of his original sentence after Hall secured a reduction of five months by pleading guilty to kissing and touching the girls in May. Attorney General Dominic Grieve had earlier told the court that the 83-year-old's sentence was unduly lenient and should be extended to reflect the culpability of Hall, the harm caused to his victims and to deter others.

Hall exploited his position of trust and authority at the BBC to gain access to four of the girls, and was able to spend time alone with others on the pretence of giving them elocution lessons. After admitting his guilt, the presenter and popular fixture on BBC Radio's football results shows, accepted that his "disgrace is complete" after previously pronouncing the claims as "cruel, pernicious and spurious". However, since his conviction fresh allegations have emerged against the disgraced presenter who was described as an opportunistic predator in court. Lancashire Police said they were working "closely" with the Crown Prosecution Service over further allegations of sex crimes against children.

Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge, sitting with Lady Justice Rafferty and Mrs Justice Macur, ruled that Hall's actions warranted a longer time behind bars after Mr Grieve said that sentence "failed adequately to reflect the gravity of the totality of the offences" and public concerns. The maximum sentence for indecent assault carries a prison term of 10 years.

Hall's QC Crispin Aylett had argued that there was nothing wrong with the sentence imposed and his client had been punished, disgraced and financially ruined.

Outside the court, Mr Grieve said: "I asked the court to consider the multiple offending by Stuart Hall over a prolonged period of time which involved numerous victims.

"I also asked that the court take into account the breaches of trust in this case - Hall carried out some of these offences in places where the victims were entitled to feel safe, he used his celebrity status to invite them to attend the BBC, and he also displayed an element of planning and premeditation.

I am pleased that the court found that 15 months was unduly lenient and have today increased that sentence to 30 months and I hope that this case has highlighted the fact that historical sexual offences are always taken very seriously and show that the law still applies, whoever the offender may be."

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk