Teenage paedophile Opemipo Jaji facing life sentence for raping girl aged 11 had 'sexual interest in very young white girls'

 

A teenager facing a life sentence today for raping an 11-year-old girl as she made her way home from school had a 'sexual interest in very young white girls' and had attacked another before, it can be revealed today.

Opemipo Jaji, 18, subjected his most recent victim to a three-hour ordeal and threatened to stab her after she tried to run away.

He was found guilty of rape at the Old Bailey after the brave youngster gave evidence against him.

Throughout his trial, the judge Mr Justice Singh had directed that the jury should not be told of Jaji's obsession with young white girls, nor the race of a girl he had attacked 21 months earlier.

In February 2011, he had attacked the 12-year-old girl on a housing estate, stuffing her school tie into her mouth, before taking her mobile phone and sexually assaulting her. Jaji continued continued the attack despite an interruption from a member of the public. He was given a 10-month detention and training order in September 2011, serving five months in custody.

Jaji, of Edmonton, north London, had denied the attack on the 11-year-old despite traces of the girl's blood being found on his clothes.

The schoolgirl was dragged into Jubilee Park, Enfield, north London, by Jaji in November.

He had spotted her in her school uniform as she joked and laughed with a friend on a bus. He followed her as she made her way home and attacked her in the dark park.

One of the girl's gloves was stuffed in her mouth and the slightly built child was terrified during the attack as she was stripped.

She ran home after she was allowed to dress. Her parents were distraught when she turned up dirty and dishevelled, the court heard.

They had called police when she failed to arrive home by 5.30pm.

The child was taken to hospital and underwent an operation for an injury.

She said: "He kept saying, 'Stop moving or I will stab you'. I tried to run away but then he grabbed me when I got to the pavement of the park entrance.

"I kept on saying 'stop' because it was hurting me and he kept saying 'shut up' to me. He was just saying it every time I spoke.

"When I was on the floor, he said he would film me and send it into my school.

"I was saying 'Get off me, get off me, stop'."

The girl said Jaji told her: "I am this close to killing you," and also threatened to film her and send copies to children at her school and to "everyone you love".

Rosina Cottage QC, prosecuting, said: "Jaji is interested in little girls and sexual acts with little girls."

Jaji was arrested a few days later after CCTV was viewed and his bedroom was searched.

A book was found about a little girl being sexually assaulted, along with ads for child care vacancies and a picture of a girl in Australia.

There was also an article about missing April Jones, "the little girl who was taken", said Miss Cottage.

Jaji was remanded in custody for reports, to be sentenced in June.

Police believe he was a dangerous paedophile whose offending was escalating.

In April last year, he was fined £15 for failing to comply with the 10-month detention and training order and a month later he was given a youth supervision order for 18 months for making indecent pictures of young girls.

Jaji was training to be a chef in November and had just left his probation officer when he got on the same bus as the schoolgirl he raped.

Sarah Maclaren of the Crown Prosecution Service said outside court: "This was a vicious and horrific attack on a young victim."

"As a result of this conviction a dangerous sexual offender has now been brought to justice.

"I would like to thank the 11-year-old victim and her family for their enormous strength and courage in supporting this prosecution."

Detective Chief Inspector Adam Lowe of the Met's Sapphire command, said: "Jaji posed a great danger to young girls and despite the great weight of evidence against him, refused to accept his guilt and forced the victim to give evidence in court.

"This was a particularly brutal but unusual attack on an innocent 11-year-old schoolgirl who will no doubt continue to suffer the emotional scars of what happened to her for a very long time.

"I would like to take this opportunity to praise the bravery of the victim and her family."

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

Beware of imitations, but the words of the soldier awarded the Victoria Cross were the real thing, says DJ Taylor
Alexander McQueen: The catwalk was a stage for the designer's astonishing and troubling vision

Alexander McQueen's astonishing vision

Ahead of a major retrospective, Alexander Fury talks to the collaborators who helped create the late designer's notorious spectacle
New BBC series savours half a century of food in Britain, from Vesta curries to nouvelle cuisine

Dinner through the decades

A new BBC series challenged Brandon Robshaw and his family to eat their way from the 1950s to the 1990s
Philippa Perry interview: The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course

Philippa Perry interview

The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef recreates the exoticism of the Indonesian stir-fry

Bill Granger's Indonesian stir-fry recipes

Our chef was inspired by the south-east Asian cuisine he encountered as a teenager
Chelsea vs Tottenham: Harry Kane was at Wembley to see Spurs beat the Blues and win the Capital One Cup - now he's their great hope

Harry Kane interview

The striker was at Wembley to see Spurs beat the Blues and win the Capital One Cup - now he's their great hope
The Last Word: For the good of the game: why on earth don’t we leave Fifa?

Michael Calvin's Last Word

For the good of the game: why on earth don’t we leave Fifa?
HIV pill: Scientists hail discovery of 'game-changer' that cuts the risk of infection among gay men by 86%

Scientists hail daily pill that protects against HIV infection

Breakthrough in battle against global scourge – but will the NHS pay for it?