Victims of Jimmy Savile call for a single inquiry

They fear current processes could leave questions unanswered

The victims of the late TV and radio presenter Jimmy Savile are calling for a single inquiry into how he was not brought to justice when he was alive.

50 people who were reportedly abused by him say they are concerned that important questions surrounding how Mr Savile operated will remain unanswered.

Currently, more than 30 separate investigations are underway by organisations linked to Mr Savile, including the BBC and the NHS.

The BBC’s independent inquiry is set to publish its findings by January. Meanwhile 32 NHS hospitals are carrying out inquiries into Savile’s conduct as it is feared he abused vulnerable patients during visits, many of them children.

Two separate reports already published almost a year ago said Savile was “a prolific, predatory sex offender” who could have been prosecuted for offences against at least three victims while he was alive.

TV presenter used his celebrity status to “hide in plain sight”, with 214 criminal offences recorded against him across 28 police forces, a report by Scotland Yard and the NSPCC has already found.

The NSPCC has told the BBC it now fears one inquiry could mean lessons are not learnt as quickly.

Solicitor Alan Collins, who represents 60 of Savile’s victims who are putting forward compensation claims said the majority are not satisfied by having separate investigations.

“It should be one inquiry, chaired by a high court judge. I fear if this does not happen, an opportunity will have been lost, not only for the victims but for the country as a whole."

He also told the BBC that by not having one inquiry there was a risk that “justice may be incomplete” and that victims want an investigation with the power to summon witnesses and release documents.

Victims say the current inquiries in place lack sufficient scope, independence and powers to address vital questions.

One 64-year-old victim, who was abused by Savile as a 15 year old, told the BBC: "There are too many individual inquiries, far too many."

He added: "Surely it would be best... if there was just one inquiry led by someone competent and, when all the evidence was gathered from up and down the country, they collated it and then we might know exactly why Jimmy Savile got away with serious sexual abuse for nearly 50 years."

Allegations about Savile, who died in 2011, emerged after ITV investigation in October 2012 in which several women said they were abused by him as teenagers.

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