From Waterloo to Glasgow Central, passengers have their say

Click to follow
The Independent Online

The 62-year-old taxi driver uses trains only when his black cab is serviced. "That's how we earn our living; trains running late, people taking taxis," he said. "I'd be out of business if I operated like that."

Bob Chesterman: The 62-year-old taxi driver uses trains only when his black cab is serviced. "That's how we earn our living; trains running late, people taking taxis," he said. "I'd be out of business if I operated like that." He is not optimistic. "You can't put right in a few years something that took 18 years to ruin."

Phil French: The businessman from Hampshire, aged 30, often travels on the French and German railways. "In Europe, what happens there [points to the announcement board] actually matches what happens on the rails. What irritates me are the strikes. If I didn't turn up for work, I would be sacked."

Mike Hollingsworth: The 17-year-old from Barrow-in-Furness on his way to join the army in Fleet, Hampshire, did not complain. "I like travelling on trains, always have," he said. He did not think they were expensive or dirty? "I am looking forward to getting dirty," he said, probably referring to his new job.

Ellie Payne: The 57-year-old local government officer from Poole, Dorset, said: "We invented the transport system ... and now we are well behind. I feel sorry for people who have to travel on trains every day. The government should never have denationalised the trains. It is going to take a big investment to put right."

Claire Dobson: Aged 38, the mother from Woking, Surrey, said the greatest joy of having children was not having to commute. "I was on a train this morning and it was late arriving but there was no apology. I object to spending so much money when you can't actually get a seat. I don't have faith in this Government. It is all talk."

Jason Shepherdson: The member of the army presentation team from Sandhurst said: "They are too expensive. If I want to take my family to York it is going to cost £100. When it is £50 by car I am always going to drive." Mr Shepherdson, 32, said the "British just shrug their shoulders" and accept inefficient trains.

Stephen Henderson: The financial adviser from Paisley, Strathclyde, says that the rail industry does not make the most of what it has.

"I travel on these trains every day and rarely are any of the fares collected on board. When you get to the station, nine times out of 10, the barriers are unmanned. Many of the rail services have been cut down, which means there are fewer opportunities to travel and longer waiting times. Just throwing money at the problem won't help.''

Alec and May O'Brien: Delays were the main bugbear for the couple from Kilmarnock who were travelling home from a weekend break in Oban, Argyle.

"It's probably going to take us over five hours to get home by rail when it would have taken us less than two and a half hours by car," said Mr O'Brien,a former British Rail maintenance worker. He said the rail system was appalling and should be back under government control.

Christopher Burrows: The insurance broker from Kilmarnock, Strathclyde, gave a mixed reaction to the government announcement.

"It's not enough and it's been far too long in coming. It's great they're going to invest more money but it's still going to take 10 years before some of the worst problems are rectified.

"If the Government wants to make the railways work they should take them back under their control. Privatisation hasn't worked."

Stacey Irvine: The Glasgow University nursing student, aged 19, uses buses whenever possible. "I would use the trains more often if I could rely on them. Most of my friends feel the same," she said. "They don't want to spend their time freezing on a platform waiting for a train that may or may not arrive on time. The bus service in Glasgow may take longer in travelling time but once you take into account all the possible delays on the trains it probably works out quicker."

Comments