Glasgow Isis bride Aqsa Mahmood 'writes poem praising Tunisia, France and Kuwait attacks as Black Friday'

‘If you show no mercy with us then why should we with you?’

A former Glasgow University student who left Britain to join Isis, Aqsa Mahmood, has written a poem praising the terror attacks in Tunisia, France and Kuwait as “a day that will go down in history”.

In a rambling online post under the name Umm Layth on a blog believed to be operated by the 20-year-old Scot, Mahmood claimed the shooting at a beach in Sousse, the bomb attack at a Shia mosque and the attempt to blow up a gas plant near Lyon were all “revenge”.

Mahmood, who is believed to have taken on a senior role in recruiting other women and girls to travel to Isis-held territories, linked the attacks to the US Supreme Court’s verdict on same sex marriage.

“Oh. But it is not for that reason that it shall be remembered,” she wrote in a blog entry entitled “Black Friday”. “It is not for this we praise.”

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A picture of Isis-controlled Raqqa in Syria shared on Aqsa Mahmood's tumblr account

Mahmood warned that the attacks, in which scores died across three countries, would leave a “permanent and blunt [mark]” and that there were “many looking up to what more could be done”.

“If you show no mercy with us then why should we with you?” she said.

In its daily bulletin on Saturday, Isis’s official al-Bayan Radio outlet claimed both the Tunisia and Kuwait attacks, but made no mention on the incident in France which saw a lorry driver accused of beheading his boss “in a car park”.

Mahmood is currently being investigated by the Metropolitan Police, who say that she will be prosecuted if she ever returns to the UK and that work on the case is “well advanced”.

At least one of the three London schoolgirls who travelled to Syria via Turkey in February is believed to have been in contact with Mahmood.

But her parents, while previously describing her as a “disgrace” for joining Isis, have described the Met’s comments about her return as “disturbing”.

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