You too can be a winner in the game of Boulle

'Made in Chelsea' star opens up his geek's guide to successful living in SW3 for Matthew Bell

He is awkward, geeky, and ginger. And yet, judging by the hordes of teenagers who worship Francis Boulle, everyone wants to be him. Well, now they can. The 24-year-old entrepreneur and star of Made in Chelsea has written a handbook to life, called Boulle's Jewels. The manual, published on Thursday, tells readers how to "live life the Boulle way, even if you've never set foot in SW3", and is packed with tips on business, love, politics and pets.

Boulle has earned a following since skateboarding on to our screens in E4's semi-scripted reality TV show. Last year, he caused a storm in Westminster by launching the website Sexymp.com, which invites the public to rank MPs by looks. Zac Goldsmith and Luciana Berger frequently top the poll, and MPs are said to spend hours voting to push themselves back up the rankings.

He first made the news by kissing Emma Watson at a polo match, but has since repositioned himself as a more youthful Alan Sugar, setting up businesses such as Fundmine, an investment platform. At last summer's Wilderness festival, Boulle spoke at a packed debate at which he proposed the motion "Happiness comes from having more", against Canon Giles Fraser. Despite increasing his share of the vote, the motion was rejected.

For all his aggressively capitalist credentials, Boulle clearly has his tongue in his cheek. As he says in the introduction of his book: "Countless books have been written on how to maximise your potential, but they all seem to be by people so far over the hill they've practically disappeared from view. With the arrogance of youth, the courage of my convictions and vast experience gleaned from the last 24 years, I offer this guide in the hope of inspiring you to create the life you deserve. Be audacious. Be bold. Be me. Just kidding. Be you, of course. The best version of you that is … the newly minted, 24k gold, Boulle's Jewels version."

How to sparkle

Here we select 10 of Boulle's most precious gems:

* "Agree a price up front and get it in writing. My mother got my first ever invoice after I'd fixed the video recorder when I was nine. But we hadn't agreed a price beforehand. She fleeced me on the deal, claiming that my payment was continued food, shelter and lifts to school. A tough, but necessary, life lesson."

* "Networking isn't a nine-to-five activity, it's a way of life. I never stop networking, whether I'm working out, having a picnic or playing polo …. Be discreet. Best not to approach anyone at funerals or AA meetings. Generally, it's bad form to network in places of worship, with the exception of banks."

* "Tweet enough, but not too much. Anything more than once an hour makes you look like a twaddict."

* "The holy trinity of money management: spend a third, save a third, invest a third. This concept was illustrated by my mother when she gave me my first allowance, at five, and subsequently took two-thirds back: one third for my piggy bank and one third to invest in my burgeoning stamp collection.

Cheers, Mumsy."

* "Remember to feed and water your staff, and reward them with day trips to the zoo."

* "Always have an exit strategy in business, but keep it legal. Best to exit without handcuffs."

* "Surround yourself with success and intelligence – both are infectious."

* "Approach the early stages of relationships as a classic military campaign. Reading The Art of War is much more useful than Cosmo at the beginning. Getting yourself into the power position is critical – the same as claiming the hill in a battle."

* "Try to befriend people called Stephen, or any derivative of the name. They seem more successful than the rest of the population."

* "Throw as many parties as you can afford. It positions you at the centre of your ever-expanding network. Everyone needs a Gatsby in their life."

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