Paris Post War: Art and Existentialism 1945-55

Jujube decided to join the Young Communists. Communism seemed to her, in that era, the only way to give sense to the life that is offered her. To justify it. To fight for victory, for herself, with others. For others. In her memory, still fresh, the wounds of torture still bled. The blood spilled was red. Our heroes were, had been or would be, would become, Communists.

Jujube became an activist and sold L'Avant-garde. She had found an effective sales technique. She transfixed the intended purchaser without giving him a chance to escape and held out the magazine in a gesture like an answer, without the unfortunate having actually asked any question. Embarrassed, he usually bought. The aim was that he should read it.

From Jujube by Juliette Greco (Eds. Stock 1982)

Paris Post War: Art and Existentialism 1945-55 at the Tate Gallery until 5 September. Sponsored by the Independent and supported by the French Embassy in London.

Independent readers can get admission at the concessionary ticket rate of pounds 2.50 (full price pounds 4) on Monday to Friday from 10am-1pm. Discounts on catalogues, some Tate shop merchandise and extended Friends Membership (15 months for pounds 25), are also available to readers at these times. These offers are only available on presentation of that day's copy of the Independent.

(Photograph omitted)

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