Labour's battle of the brothers gets personal

David Miliband will today make his strongest criticism of his younger brother Ed with the Labour leadership contest getting personal as it reaches a critical stage.

The former foreign secretary will suggest his brother is pandering to Labour's core vote rather than reaching out to the middle classes and that his strategy will keep the party in opposition rather than return it to power.

David Miliband will set out clear dividing lines between him and his brother, seen as the two front-runners in the race to succeed Gordon Brown. Ballot papers will be sent out next week and the result announced on 25 September.

The shadow Foreign Secretary will say that Labour must be an alternative government as well as an effective Opposition. "Opposition is necessary but insufficient. At worst it can take us back into our comfort zone – and our pantomime role in politics," he will say. "We need not just to oppose this Government. We need to defeat them."

David Miliband will insist that he is the best candidate to prevent the Government painting his party as Old Labour. "We need to break out of the mould the Coalition is trying to put us in," he will say. "Their attacks on our record are only the first phase of their campaign. They seek to make Labour irrelevant. I will not let them."

He will say that Labour's leadership contest has spent, "a lot of time looking inwards and backwards, when we need to look outwards and forwards". He will pledge to look "outside our tent" and talk about the change that Britain, rather than the party, needs.

Calling on Labour to shift to the centre ground, he will say: "We must look forwards for new ideas and outwards for a new coalition of voters..

"We are pigeonholed as spendthrift when we need to be prudent; we are seen as accreting power to the state when in fact our mission is to empower individuals, communities and businesses; and we are seen as the establishment when we need to be the insurgents." Yesterday he won the support of his 100th Labour MP.

Ed Miliband, the shadow Energy and Climate Change Secretary, moved to head off his brother's criticism by insisting he is "the moderniser". He said that, since 1997, Labour had lost 1.7 million middle-class voters. But he argued that Labour had lost a total of 5 million voters, with the largest losses amongst the C2, and D and E social classes.

Ed Miliband said: "I am the only candidate who can reach out to those whom we have lost.

"To those middle-class voters who have switched to the Lib Dems I say look at how Labour is changing."

Contenders go negative...

David Miliband on Ed Miliband:

"If I thought Ed would be a better leader than me, I'd be running his campaign."

Ed Miliband to David Miliband:

"I think it [the Iraq war] has been profoundly damaging to Britain, David, and I disagree with you on that."

Diane Abbott on Ed Balls

"If Ed Balls says he was not involved [in Brown-Blair infighting]... it must have been his evil twin brother."

Ed Balls on the Miliband brothers:

"Yvette [Cooper, his wife] and I decided it would have been weird [to run against each other as the Milibands have]. I don't think we really needed to talk about it."

Diane Abbott on the Milibands:

"We're not going to be able to engage with society and, particularly, engage young people in politics, if they see the political class as a caste apart, a strange sort of geeky young men in suits."

Andy Burnham on the Milibands:

"I didn't have well-connected parents. People are looking for politicians who have real-life experience."

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Scrum Master - Southampton, Hampshire - Excellent Package

£40000 - £60000 per annum + Excellent benefits: Deerfoot IT Resources Limited:...

Senior Scrum Master - Hampshire - £47k

£47000 per annum + Excellent benefits: Deerfoot IT Resources Limited: Key skil...

Geography Teacher

£110 - £200 per day + pension and childcare: Randstad Education Maidstone: Geo...

KS1 Teacher

£110 - £120 per annum + TBA: Randstad Education Reading: KS1 Teacher needed fo...

Day In a Page

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice