Diabetes rates soar as 18 States see diagnosed cases double

 

Minneapolis, USA

The number of people living with diabetes is soaring in the United States, as 18 states had at least a doubling in those with the illness since 1995, a government survey found.

Diabetics made up 6 percent or more of the population in all 50 states in 2010, an increase from just three states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico in 1995, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rates are increasing in tandem with obesity, which has reached epidemic proportions as physical activity levels plunge and daily calorie counts soar, according to the CDC.

The findings have health and economic implications as the number of Americans with diabetes is expected to continue climbing unless effective prevention and treatment efforts are established, Ann Albright, director of the CDC's division of diabetes translation, said. Diabetes costs topped $174 billion in 2007, the most recent numbers available, with about $1 of every $10 spent on health care going toward the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association.

"It's potentially a big problem, and it's a problem that is going to increase," said Adrian Vella, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who studies the development of prediabetes. "The longer that people live the more likely they are to have diabetes. And the longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to have complications from it."

The findings in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report are based on telephone surveys conducted across the U.S. Researchers asked people if had been told they had diabetes. They didn't differentiate between Type 1, which develops in children who stop producing the hormone insulin, and Type 2, which accounts for as many as 95 percent of cases. Type 2 diabetes, where the body doesn't properly use insulin, generally occurs in older people who are overweight and sedentary.

"Regionally, we saw the largest increase in diagnosed diabetes prevalence in the South, followed by the West, Midwest and Northeast," said Linda Geiss, a CDC statistician and the lead study author, in a statement. The findings confirm earlier reports that the highest numbers of people diagnosed with diabetes live in the south and the Appalachian states, she said.

The news wasn't all bad. The increased number of people with diabetes probably stems in part from better survival among people with the disease, the CDC report said. Death rates fell faster among diabetics than those without it from 1997 through 2006 as medical care improved, national data shows.

The greatest reason for the increase is the number of newly diagnosed cases each year since 1990, according to the report. While some of the increase may stem from better detection, it also coincides with higher obesity rates, the report found.

Almost 19 million people in the U.S. were diagnosed with diabetes in 2010, and another 7 million had undetected disease, according to the CDC.

The states with the largest increases in diabetes rates from 1995 through 2010 were Oklahoma, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama and Washington. In Oklahoma alone, the diabetes rate rose 227 percent, the study found. In six states and Puerto Rico, the number of diabetics was 10 percent or more of the population in 2010. They were Alabama, Mississippi, West Virginia, Tennessee, Texas and South Carolina.

The CDC findings confirm what doctors are seeing in their practices across the country, Vella said during a telephone interview. It's critical that people work to remain as close as possible to their healthy body weight, which is one of the best ways to prevent development of the disease, he said.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
News
The cartoon depicts the UK (far left) walking around a Syrian child refugee
newsIn an exclusive artwork for The Independent, Ali Ferzat attacks Britain's lack of 'humanity'
Life and Style
tech
Arts and Entertainment
film
Sport
footballManager attacks Sky Sports pundit Jamie Redknapp after criticism of Diego Costa's apparent stamping
News
video
Life and Style
food + drink
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Infrastructure / Development Support

£20000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Fantastic opportunity to join a...

Recruitment Genius: Partnership Relationship Manager

£35000 - £45000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Partnership Relationship Mana...

Recruitment Genius: Mobile Developer - Xamarin

£45000 - £60000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This software development compa...

Recruitment Genius: Student Support Assistants - Part Time & Full Time

£14600 - £17600 per annum: Recruitment Genius: If you are passionate about sup...

Day In a Page

Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness
Homeless Veterans appeal: Homeless in Wales can find inspiration from Daniel’s story

Homeless Veterans appeal

Homeless in Wales can find inspiration from Daniel’s story
Front National family feud? Marine Le Pen and her relatives clash over French far-right party's response to Paris terror attacks

Front National family feud?

Marine Le Pen and her relatives clash over French far-right party's response to Paris terror attacks
Pot of gold: tasting the world’s most expensive tea

Pot of gold

Tasting the world’s most expensive tea
10 best wildlife-watching experiences: From hen harriers to porpoises

From hen harriers to porpoises: 10 best wildlife-watching experiences

While many of Britain's birds have flown south for the winter, it's still a great time to get outside for a spot of twitching
Nick Easter: 'I don’t want just to hold tackle bags, I want to be out there'

'I don’t want just to hold tackle bags, I want to be out there'

Nick Easter targeting World Cup place after England recall
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore