Khizr Khan, father of Muslim American war hero, says anti-Trump protesters are 'scared' by his plans

'He may have won the electoral college, but he must win the respect of everyone. And respect is not given by demand. Respect is earned'

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The Independent US

Khizr Khan, the father of a decorated US soldier killed in Iraq, has called on Donald Trump to address the concerns of those who fear for their safety following his election win. 

Mr Khan, who campaigned for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in the race to the White House, appealed to the President-elect to consider all Americans and not just those who had voted for him, saying he must "win the respect of everyone". 

He became the face of Muslim America after he challenged Mr Trump to read the US constitution and stop inciting hatred during a speech at the Democratic National Convention last year. 

His son, Army Captain Humayun Khan, was killed while serving in Iraq in 2004. 

"It is his obligation to address the concerns of all Americans, not only those who have voted for him," said Mr Khan in an interview on All In With Chris Hayes on cable channel MSNBC.

"We are told by our leadership that we must come together and we must accept him as our leader. Wait a minute, it does not work that way."

Mr Khan also pointed the finger at Mr Trump for the protests surging across America since the election result was announced. 

"I want to remind Mr Trump that you have not gotten the majority of the popular vote," he said. 

"These folks are scared because of his statements and his policies, and he has not extended a hand of courtesy or affection."

He also offered sobering advice to the President-elect to unite the country, telling him “respect is earned”. 

"He may have won the electoral college, but he must win the respect of everyone. And respect is not given by demand. Respect is earned,” he said. 

"It has been three days and we have not heard anything of reconciliation, anything of leading all of America forward."

In a speech on Sunday, just days ahead of the vote, Mr Khan asked the Republican candidate if his son would have had a place in Mr Trump's America. 

“Would Muslims have a place in your America? Would Latinos have a place in your America? Would African-Americans have a place in your America, Donald Trump?” he asked. 

“Thankfully, Donald Trump, this isn’t your America.”

Mr Trump called for a ban on Muslims in December last year. He has since adjusted the plan to prohibit entry for people from countries with heavy terrorist activity, but has yet to clarify which countries would be included in that category.

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