A choice between flight for safety or solidarity

With no electricity, water or gas, many have been tempted to head south – but not everyone

Hiroko Yamamoto stood and watched as a crane lifted and removed the wrecked remains of a large car that the tsunami had dumped in the entrance to her business. A knee-length padded jacket covered her body and a look of quiet concern spread across her face.

"The damage is huge. There is no electricity or water or gas. I want to escape as soon as possible but I cannot," she said. "We are going to rebuild."

There were a number of business owners in this port area close to the city of Sendai juggling with the same contrasting instincts yesterday, the human desire to flee to somewhere safe and the other instinct to display a strong spirit and not to show any fear. In Japan, the latter is called 'Yamato-Damashii' or Japanese spirit and it has been on people's lips a lot in recent days. "It's a traditional thing in Japan, like Bushido – the Samurai spirit. It's from ancient times," added Ms Yamamoto. "I think it's in our DNA. It's an unconscious thing. It's passed on by our parents."

Ms Yamamoto, manager of an industrial compressor outlet, said since the tsunami had struck she had been impressed by how her neighbours had reached out to each other. In Japan's urban areas, such neighbourly spirit was often lacking, she said, and yet since last Friday people had been sharing meals, water and help. "We have become very friendly. It helps to have connections with people at a time like this."

Such a determination to help had partly inspired her to get the business going again as quickly as possible, despite the devastation suffered in this part of the country. The same was true of Shingi Suda whose company supplied rubbish trucks. All had been carried away by the massive wave. Yesterday afternoon he was going through the wrecked remains of his employees' cars, collecting knick-knacks and personal items to return to them.

He was also aware of the possible radiation threat, but as with Ms Yamamoto he had decided to stay. He knew about the 50 workers who stayed at their posts at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, battling to avert a disaster. He claimed he would have done the same thing: "I respect them. They are heroes, putting their lives on the line. I would have done the same," he said.

Across the road, the edges piled high with wrecked cars, Takashi Makabe, was hoping a similar spirit would see him and his wife through the disaster. They owned a shop that sold sea-fishing tackle and rods and rented out a boat to fishermen. But the store had been wrecked, one instance in which the sea had not been kind to them. They looked weary.

It was their practice to post an image of their customers' largest catches on the shop wall, but the room was now dominated by a white Suzuki car, which had been thrown through the window like a game fish leaping from the ocean. It had come to rest among the lead weights and fluorescent orange fishing lures. "It's not as if we want to rebuild, but we have to. It's not just the Japanese who have that spirit, many people do.".

He also knew about the 50 workers at the Fukushima plant and somehow linked their heroism with the spirit being displayed by himself and his neighbours. "I would have done the same thing had I been in their situation. If something happened and you evacuated you would never forgive yourself."

A short drive away Toshiko Sugiyama was likewise trying to get ready for work. He owned a restaurant that served Korean food. The tsunami had wrecked the ground floor and left thick mud and debris across the entrance. He and a nephew were busy with shovels. He too was staying put.

He was also aware of the nuclear workers, but made no bold claims that he would have matched their actions. He said: "Everything here is so bad for me at the moment that this is all I can think about."

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Warehouse Operative

£14000 - £15000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An opportunity has arisen for a...

Ashdown Group: Senior .Net Developer - Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey

£70000 - £80000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A long-established, technology rich ...

Recruitment Genius: Digital Project Manager

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This growing digital marketing ...

Recruitment Genius: Electrical Quality Supervisor

£28000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: The Midland's leading Solar Panels provi...

Day In a Page

Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
8 best workout DVDs

8 best workout DVDs

If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

Paul Scholes column

I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable