British appeal tally set to reach £200m

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The Independent Online

The appeal for the victims of the tsunami is expected to raise £200m, the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) said yesterday. That meant the DEC can wind down its appeal, though it is expecting planned fundraising events to continue, the organisation said.

The appeal for the victims of the tsunami is expected to raise £200m, the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) said yesterday. That meant the DEC can wind down its appeal, though it is expecting planned fundraising events to continue, the organisation said.

Money to be raised from them is built into spending plans, it added. The figure given a week ago by the DEC for money pledged was £100m.

A spokeswoman said the committee expected most of the money promised to arrive by the end of next month.

The DEC chairman, David Glencross, on behalf of the trustees, said: "We asked the British public to respond urgently and generously, and they have done so magnificently. They have made an unprecedented contribution, which will make a real difference to the lives and livelihoods of people affected by this disaster over the years to come."

The organisation said that the DEC agencies would continue to work together. "Their priority now is to ensure that money is moving to where it is needed most, in support of co-ordinated action with national governments and the United Nations.

"The agencies will concentrate on meeting immediate needs in the first, one-year phase of the relief operation while planning longer-term work. They are already providing food, shelter, clothing, medical supplies, and access to clean water.The second phase will last two years. It will emphasise rehabilitation and livelihoods projects, to make a lasting difference to people's lives."

Brendan Gormley, chief executive of the DEC, said: "The generosity of the public has been humbling. The DEC agencies are immensely grateful, and they are already getting aid to those who need it most. We are all fully committed to reporting back on progress on a regular basis."

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