Snake in cereal: Man rattled by python found coiled up and hiding in his box of cornflakes

The cardboard box had to be cut open to get the huge diamond python out

A man claims to have had a real-life kitchen nightmare after he saw a long coiled-up snake poke its head out of his box of cereal.

Jarred Smith, 22, was making lunch on Tuesday when he spotted the two-metre diamond python hiding inside the open cornflakes package – according to the Daily Telegraph in Australia.

The frightening change from free gifts that would usually be found in a box of cereal caused Mr Smith to drop his food on the counter in terror and sent him running out of his kitchen door.


He and his father, who was luckily at home in the Sydney suburb of Davidson at the time, called up a wildlife rescue service to come and help them deal with the slithery creature that had snuck in and taken up residence.

New South Wales Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service arrived at the house to take away the snake before releasing it back in its natural bushland habitat. Diamond pythons are able to spend up to two weeks at a time waiting in the same spot for prey.

Chris McGreal, who rescued the python, said – according to the Daily Telegraph: “The python was over 2m long and I couldn’t believe it was jammed into this small cereal box.

“When I got there I actually had to tear the box to get it out, that’s how tightly squeezed in it was. It’s likely it was hiding in there to feel secure.”

Diamond pythons usually hunt for rodents in Australia

Diamond pythons are non-venomous, tend to keep a low profile and are the most commonly found snakes in the New South Wales region. They kill their prey by constricting and suffocating them.

The black reptiles with yellow and cream markings only bite humans if they feel extremely threatened. They can sometimes leave teeth stuck in flesh.

The species is even welcomed in and around people’s gardens and rooftops in Australia as they pose minimal threat to humans while feeding on unwanted rodents and pests.