Ceasefire allows citizens to cross religious barriers

The sound of church bells and the shrieks of children tobogganing down icy roads in the Christmas-card landscape of Sarajevo marked the start of an unusually peaceful Christmas yesterday. The calm was marred only by occasional bursts of gunfire, and the

rumblings of government accusations of Serb treachery around the north-western enclave of Bihac, where fighting continued near the town of Velika Kladusa.

Ejup Ganic, the Bosnian Vice-President, told reporters that Bosnian Serb forces were violating the cease-fire by moving west and attacking across the Croatian border, masquerading as Croatian Serbs and rebel Muslim forces who are not signatories to the deal.

The government had asked the United Nations to act immediately to end the fighting, and to provide humanitarian aid to the enclave by today. Otherwise, Mr Ganic said, in an implicit threat to break the ceasefire, the Bosnian army might feel compelled to attack elsewhere to relieve the pressure on Bihac.

The UN, which said it was investigating the claims, confirmed that there was continued fighting around Kladusa, but a spokesman said there was no evidence yet of Bosnian Serb involvement.

"Our message to the Bosnian government has been that this particular worry really should not be allowed to torpedo what is a very promising development towards peace in Bosnia," Lieutenant-Colonel Gary Coward said. He added that elsewhere the ceasefire was holding, with only 29 violations in Sarajevo. "Certainly in spirit, at least, it is being observed."

The truce, which came into effect at noon on Christmas Eve, added to the holiday spirit in the capital. Hundreds of Sarajevans of all denominations crowded into the Catholic cathedral for midnight Mass taken by Cardinal Vinko Puljic. Only about a third of the congregation took communion - a sign that many of those present were Muslims or Serbs. "It's the first time I've come," said one Muslim man standing in the aisle. "It's great - Happy Christmas."

The smell of incense and the sound of familiar carols sung in Serbo-Croat filled the church, whose only war wounds were a few broken panes in the stained-glass windows. The prayers inside were for peace, the mood in the streets celebratory, as citizens enjoyed the traditional lifting of the 10pm curfew. Friends gathered at cafes and bars to drink and dance to Yugo-pop, traditional folk and MTV top 20 hits.

Christmas, although celebrated by Muslims and Serbs (who honour Orthodox Christmas in two weeks time) with their Croat friends, is really a prelude to New Year, the one festival everybody owns. But a holiday is a holiday, especially for a people weary ofdeath and destruction and fear. As one man born on Christmas Eve said, as he looked out of the window at the Heroes' Graveyard below: "Every day is a birthday for me - if I stay alive till tomorrow, that's a birthday."

Husein Svizdic and his wife, Violeta, have watched countless burials in the barren field - formerly a tree-filled park - beyond their stone house. "My mother still cries at every funeral," Mrs Svizdic said, shortly after the burial of Mirsad Delic, a policeman killed when two shells hit a market last Thursday. She had watched as Mr Delic's family, friends and colleagues buried him in the frozen earth. "He was my friend," her husband said.

From the snowy cemetery, the only splash of colour the freshly turned brown earth and a single bouquet of purple cloth flowers, it was a scene from a Dutch Old Master. Mrs Svizdic, pale-faced, young and serious, her dark hair scraped back from her forehead, looked like a Rembrandt woman. "For my birthday [in November] there were 13 burials," she said. "My mother cried all day."

But inside her cosy house there was laughter - mostly the black humour of Sarajevo, where life (rather than mere survival) depends on friends and, wherever possible, good times. The festive season has brought its fair share of casualties, but this year most are due to the combination of drink and ice.

"We've been very busy here since the ceasefire took effect, but it has been mainly broken arms and legs," said Dr Mufid Lazovic, of Kosevo hospital. "We are treating casualties from the snow, not from the war, and though it may sound strange, these brok

e n bones are a real relief," he said.

The hospital did have to treat a Bosnian soldier shot in the leg by a sniper while on front-line duty near the zoo, but otherwise the war clinic was quiet. However, many Sarajevans remain deeply suspicious of Bosnian Serb intentions, and few can believe peace is really in sight.

Mediha, a young soldier with mauve eye-shadow and an Islamic scarf draped over her head, broke with convention to attend Mirsad Delic's funeral, normally a men-only ceremony.

Did she think this would be her last wartime burial? "No," she said firmly. "It's not likely. In fact, now is the time to be very careful and cautious." Her father, also a soldier, added: "They always sign it and they always break it."

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Sport
CSKA Moscow celebrate after equalising with a late penalty
football

Arts and Entertainment
music
Life and Style
Designer Oscar de la Renta takes a bow after showing his Spring 2015 collection in September, his last show before his death
fashionThe passing of the legendary designer has left a vacancy: couturier to America’s royalty, says fashion editor Alexander Fury
Life and Style
tech

Company reveals $542m investment in start-up building 'a rocket ship for the mind'

News
Bourgogne wine maker Laboure-Roi vice president Thibault Garin (L) offers the company's 2013 Beaujolais Nouveau wine to the guest in the wine spa at the Hakone Yunessun spa resort facilities in Hakone town, Kanagawa prefecture, some 100-kilometre west of Tokyo
i100
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

IT Project Manager

Competitive: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: Our client based in Chelmsford a...

Business Intelligence Specialist - work from home

£40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: An established and growing IT Consultancy fir...

Business Intelligence Specialist - work from home

£40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: An established and growing IT Consultancy fir...

IT Manager

£40000 - £45000 per annum + pension, healthcare,25 days: Ashdown Group: An est...

Day In a Page

Indiana serial killer? Man arrested for murdering teenage prostitute confesses to six other murders - and police fear there could be many more

A new American serial killer?

Police fear man arrested for murder of teen prostitute could be responsible for killing spree dating back 20 years
Online petitions: Sign here to change the world

Want to change the world? Just sign here

The proliferation of online petitions allows us to register our protests at the touch of a button. But do they change anything?
How to Get Away with Murder: Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama

How to Get Away with Murder

Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama
A cup of tea is every worker's right

Hard to swallow

Three hospitals in Leicester have banned their staff from drinking tea and coffee in public areas. Christopher Hirst explains why he thinks that a cuppa is every worker's right
Which animals are nearly extinct?

Which animals are nearly extinct?

Conservationists in Kenya are in mourning after the death of a white northern rhino, which has left the species with a single male. These are the other species on the brink
12 best children's shoes

Perfect for leaf-kicking: 12 best children's shoes

Find footwear perfect to keep kids' feet protected this autumn
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why