Italian politicians push to remove fidelity promise from wedding vows

'It’s the legacy of an outdated and antiquated vision of marriage, family and the duties and rights between spouses'

Click to follow
The Independent Online

Italians may no longer have to promise fidelity in their wedding vows if a new bill to remove the clause from marriage contracts is approved.

Some politicians are pushing for the amendment to Italy's Civil Code because it no longer represents marriage in the modern day, they say. 

“It’s the legacy of an outdated and antiquated vision of marriage, family and the duties and rights between spouses," said Senator Laura Cantini, one of those behind the amendment.

To support their case, senators cited a previous ruling from Italy’s top court, which made it illegal for judges to place the blame for separation "on the mere failure to observe the duty of fidelity".

The ruling meant that partners now have to prove the infidelity led to an irreconcilable breakdown of the marriage.

The new bill was proposed to Italy’s Senate last year and is now being considered by its Judiciary Committee. 

"Until not long ago, only the fidelity of the woman was sufficient to guarantee the 'legitimacy' of children," it states. 

It also argues that there should be no place in law for legislation against sex, saying fidelity should be thought of in terms of “trust and respect”.

The clause on fidelity was omitted from Italy’s Civil Unions bill, passed earlier in the year, provoking a furious backlash from the Lesbian Gay Bisxeual and Transgender (LGTB) community who felt the bill did not give them complete parity with heterosexual couples. 

According to one 2015 poll, 45 per cent of Italians have cheated on their partners, one of the highest European scores, along with France and Germany. 

The same poll found 36 per cent of Brits had been unfaithful. 

Comments