Proud to be plastic: The 'improved' beauty contest

Enhanced breasts, noses, and even toes: Hungary hosts a world first

It had to happen: a beauty contest for the surgically enhanced. The inevitable took place in Budapest on Friday night, when the city staged Miss Plastic Hungary. And, since behind every cosmetically amended woman there is a surgeon, there were prizes for the scalpel-wielders, too.

It was a night for unnatural beauties. Contestants showed off breast implants, nose jobs and facelifts as Miss Plastic Hungary 2009 strove to promote the benefits of plastic surgery in a country where such enhancements are viewed mostly with a wary eye. "I think this competition is long overdue," said Marton Szipal, a photographer and one of the judges. "Hungarians used to laugh about plastic surgery but it's time for Hungarian women to care more about their appearance. They are the most beautiful in Europe."

To qualify for the pageant, the 18 Hungarian contestants had to prove they'd gone under the knife – mere Botox or collagen injections did not count. Nearly all of them showed off augmented breasts, while reshaped noses were also popular. One finalist had surgically adjusted toes.

The organisers claimed the women were expected to demonstrate "a perfect harmony of body and soul", but the three-part contest concentrated almost exclusively on their physical attributes, leaving even the conspicuous wishes for world peace, common in more traditional beauty pageants, missing.

Entrants, who were at least 18 years old, included a former rhythmic gymnast, a firefighter married to a police officer, a mother of three and several strippers. There was a separate category for women aged over 30.

The rules, should anyone think of replicating the event in footballers' wives land, were particular about who could, or could not, compete. They declared the contest open to any 18-year-old who "has had local anaesthetic or dormant plastic surgery. The so-called ambulant injection treatments such as Botox, hyaluronic acid or collagen injections, furthermore, lip treatments like Artecoll, are not sufficient for applying for the contest. Mechanical skin treatment or that with laser or acid are subject to individual reconsideration".

The overall winner, Reka Urban, a 22-year-old hostess, won an apartment in Budapest, while the first runner-up, Edina Kulcsar, was given a new car and the second runner-up, Alexandra Horvath, took home diamond jewellery worth two million forints (£6,750). Their surgeons also received awards.

Ms Horvath's plastic surgeon, Dr Tamas Rozsos, said the contest showed that cosmetic corrections did not have to be about oversized breasts, bulbous lips and skin stretched to near tearing point.

"This is about restoring harmony... eliminating asymmetries and giving women the opportunity to have normal features," Dr Rozsos said. "Plastic surgery has a bad reputation in Hungary, but it is mostly due to the exaggerations."

Hungary has been hit hard by the global economic crisis, with the government forced to scale back spending on health services, but Dr Rozsos said the number of plastic surgeries has been rising year by year.

"People for whom this is important always find the money," he said.

News
peopleFrankie Boyle responds to referendum result in characteristically offensive style
News
news
Life and Style
Couples have been having sex less in 2014, according to a new survey
life
New Articles
i100... with this review
PROMOTED VIDEO
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Voices
Holly's review of Peterborough's Pizza Express quickly went viral on social media
Sport
footballTim Sherwood: This might be th match to wake up Manchester City
Arts and Entertainment
musicHow female vocalists are now writing their own hits
New Articles
i100
News
news
Arts and Entertainment
musicBiographer Hunter Davies has collected nearly a hundred original manuscripts
News
Blahnik says: 'I think I understand the English more than they do themselves'
people
Arts and Entertainment
Michelle Dockery as Lady Mary Crawley in Downton Abbey
TVInside Downton Abbey series 5
Life and Style
The term 'normcore' was given the oxygen of publicity by New York magazine during the autumn/winter shows in Paris in February
fashionWhen is a trend a non-trend? When it's Normcore, since you ask
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Marketing Manager - Leicestershire - £35,000

£30000 - £35000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager (CIM, B2B, MS Offi...

Marketing Executive (B2B and B2C) - Rugby, Warwickshire

£22000 - £25000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A highly successful organisation wit...

SEN Coordinator + Teacher (SENCO)

£1 per day: Randstad Education Leeds: Job Purpose To work closely with the he...

Research Manager - Quantitative/Qualitative

£32000 - £42000 Per Annum: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: Our client is curr...

Day In a Page

Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits
Mystery of the Ground Zero wedding photo

A shot in the dark

Mystery of the wedding photo from Ground Zero
His life, the universe and everything

His life, the universe and everything

New biography sheds light on comic genius of Douglas Adams
Save us from small screen superheroes

Save us from small screen superheroes

Shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D are little more than marketing tools
Reach for the skies

Reach for the skies

From pools to football pitches, rooftop living is looking up
These are the 12 best hotel spas in the UK

12 best hotel spas in the UK

Some hotels go all out on facilities; others stand out for the sheer quality of treatments
These Iranian-controlled Shia militias used to specialise in killing American soldiers. Now they are fighting Isis, backed up by US airstrikes

Widespread fear of Isis is producing strange bedfellows

Iranian-controlled Shia militias that used to kill American soldiers are now fighting Isis, helped by US airstrikes
Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Shoppers don't come to Topshop for the unique
How to make a Lego masterpiece

How to make a Lego masterpiece

Toy breaks out of the nursery and heads for the gallery
Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Urbanites are cursed with an acronym pointing to Employed but No Disposable Income or Savings
Paisley’s decision to make peace with IRA enemies might remind the Arabs of Sadat

Ian Paisley’s decision to make peace with his IRA enemies

His Save Ulster from Sodomy campaign would surely have been supported by many a Sunni imam