Pakistanis irate over PM's 'exporting terror' remark

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

David Cameron sparked a diplomatic row yesterday by warning that Pakistan should not be allowed to "promote the export of terror" to the rest of the world. Speaking during a two-day visit to India, the Prime Minister increased the pressure on Pakistan following this week's leak of classified documents about the war in Afghanistan, which suggested that Pakistan's ISI intelligence agency could be supporting the Taliban insurgency.

"We should be very clear with Pakistan that we want to see a strong, stable and democratic Pakistan," Mr Cameron said during a question and answer session in Bangalore. "But we cannot tolerate the idea that this country is allowed to look both ways and is able, in any way, to promote the export of terror whether to India, Afghanistan or to anywhere else in the world."

His spokeswoman stressed that he had not been accusing the Pakistani Government of sponsoring terrorism, but was repeating his demands for it to do more to "shut terror groups down".

Abdul Basit, a Pakistan Foreign Ministry spokesman, insisted: "There is no question of Pakistan looking the other way." He dismissed the claims in the leaked documents as "crude, self-serving and unverifiable" and said Mr Cameron should not have used them.

Pakistani senator Khurshid Ahmad, vice-president of the Islamist Jamaat-e-Islami Party, warned that the Prime Minister's remarks risked fuelling "anti-American, anti-West" feeling on the streets. "I am deeply concerned," he said. "The basis on which this statement has been made is very fragile. The documents released are unreliable – 90 per cent of them have been attributed to the Afghan intelligence agencies, whose reports are unreliable."

Mr Cameron's comments came a day after he raised eyebrows on a visit to Turkey by describing Gaza as "a prison camp". Aides insisted his remarks about Pakistan were not a gaffe but reflected concern about suggestions in the leaked documents.

Later, the Prime Minister stuck to his guns, telling the BBC: "We have to be clear in our dealings with the Pakistanis ... it is unacceptable for support to be given from within Pakistan for any organisations that export terror."

He said he was choosing his words carefully because Britain believed there was a distinction between the government of Pakistan and some state agencies. But he conceded there had been "big progress" in targeting terror.

The Prime Minister told his Indian audience that Britain and India had been united in suffering from terrorism which originated in Pakistan. He cited the 2005 London tube bombings and the 2008 attacks in Mumbai.

Denis MacShane, a former Foreign Office minister, warned that Mr Cameron's "foolish insults" of Pakistan would be counter-productive. "He should be seeking to lower tensions between India and Pakistan and not involve Britain in one-sided policies which will alienate the important British-Pakistani community in Britain," he said.

BAE Systems, Europe's biggest defence contractor, and engine maker Rolls-Royce marked Mr Cameron's visit by signing a deal worth about £700m with a state-run Indian firm to supply 57 Hawk trainer jets to India.

The Prime Minister announced that export licences for civil nuclear expertise and technology to India would be approved, unlocking a potentially lucrative market for British companies.

The move follows lobbying by the British nuclear industry and comes despite opposition in Whitehall. Groups such as Rolls-Royce and Serco have been prevented from selling components because of fears the technology could be used for India's military programme.

Vince Cable, the Business Secretary, a member of the British delegation with Mr Cameron, said: "There are sensitivities we are conscious of, as are the Indian Government, but within those constraints we want to really push ahead with civil nuclear cooperation."

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?