'My best find was in a skip': Wayne Amiel reveals his dedication to abandoned plants

 

I used to know the streets round London's Clapham Old Town reasonably well, wheeling pushchairs past the grand façades of The Pavement, balancing small children on swings in Grafton Square, haring after scooters in Rectory Gardens. Someone once told me this was the oldest squat in London. I like Rectory Gardens – the random collections of stuff tacked on to walls, the small bits of garden laid straight on to the street, shored up with timber offcuts, casually, promiscuously planted with marigolds and lettuce, petunias and parsley.

The layout of city streets like these in south-west London rarely allows you to see what's going on in people's gardens, hidden at the backs of the houses. Many of the terraces front straight on to the pavement; where there are patches in front of the houses, as in Grafton Square, they are treated in a fairly minimal fashion. Sometimes you see a big pear tree in a back garden, rearing up over the slope of a roof. If I catch a glimpse of one, I cheer. The odds against the survival of these old trees, remnants of the orchards and market gardens that once ringed London, are now huge.

The levels catch you out, too. Sometimes you go up steps to a front door, but then have to plunge down at the back to access the garden space. Sometimes the garden is at the same level as the front hall. You haven't any idea when you step into a house what you are going to emerge into on the other side. It's like being Alice as she goes through the mirror. And never more so, for me, than at Wayne Amiel's place in Turret Grove, a pretty street in Clapham Old Town, that runs down the hill from Rectory Grove to North Street.

Amiel describes it as "Clapham meets Jamaica", with the wild, bold colours off the Caribbean jostling side by side with English favourites such as sweet peas. Yes, it's all of that, wonderfully exuberant, but what struck me first was the way that the garden sailed high above its neighbours on either side. Very private, ringed round with greenery and completely over-the-top lilies, it's suspended but secluded too, a difficult double act to bring off.

Sitting in the semi-basement kitchen/dining room at the back of the house, you don't see any of this. At this bottom level, Amiel added a glass-roof extension which opens out on to a series of wide, very steep steps that, if you were brave enough to tackle them, would bring you out into the main garden above. But from inside, what you see is a dazzling array of pots lined out at each level: pelargoniums, hostas, impatiens, cosmos, petunias. "It's my homage to Amsterdam Flower Market," says Amiel. "I used to go there every morning, have a coffee, read the paper. My idea of heaven."

But I'm wondering how he gets all these things to flower so well. This is a north-facing garden, just 65ft long by 25ft wide, and the steps don't get much sun. "I've got a sick bay at the back of the garden," he explains. "A table in my only sunny corner. All the pots get a holiday there to cheer them up, and bring the plants into flower." It turns out that Amiel is up by about half past four each morning, spends an hour and a half in the garden, then goes to the gym for an hour before leaving for work (he's a manager in the NHS).

So, quite a driven man, I enquire rather unnecessarily? "You could say so, but I just love my garden. I love my flowers. I especially love to buy things on the 'damaged' stand at the garden centre and nurse them back to health. My best find was in a skip – a lilac. It was just a twig, but it's turned into a fabulous thing, deep purple gorgeousness."

We've come up the stairs from the semi-basement now and are standing on a deck adjoining the back of the house, from where you can look down on the rows of plants on the steps below. The deck is surrounded by greenery: fat hostas, a tall tree fern. There's abutilon and strawberries, fabulous gerberas, masses of herbs, twisty willow, brightly patterned coleus, grown from seed. "I grow a lot from seed, take cuttings. The box room upstairs is a kind of potting shed and in the winter every mantelshelf is lined up with plants that can't stay out in the cold."

There are cornflowers, geums, an elegant purple-leaved acer and a trachelospermum scrambling up the arch that separates the first deck from a second, smaller decked area beyond. Most of the plants seem to be in pots. "How many pots," I ask. "More than two hundred," Amiel replies. "I gave up counting." He makes his own compost in a beehive-shaped bin, and mixes this with bought-in compost and sand for his planting.

The trees – twisty willow, acers, weeping silver birch, robinia – are root-pruned every three years. Some are planted in the ground, rather than pots, but Amiel reckons he's helped by the fact that an Anderson air-raid shelter stretches under much of his plot. The layer of earth on top is quite thin and this keeps the trees to a manageable size.

Beyond the second deck is a circular lawn, edged with brick. "It used to be much bigger, but I kept nibbling away at it to find room for more plants." But what about watering all this lot, I ask, waving a hand round the extravagant pots of lilies, the dahlias, ferns, the hops and passion flower smothering the fence, the gunnera and bamboo, the bright photinia, the foxgloves and fig, the hostas with leaves as big as ponchos? "Oh, I love watering," he says. "It's really relaxing after a stressful day at work. And I prefer using a watering can to a hose. You can give each plant just what it needs."

After spending five years building up this amazing garden, Amiel is opening it for the first time. You can visit tomorrow, between 10am-5pm, admission £3. A bargain.

Discover more property articles at Homes and Property
Sport
Luis Suarez and Lionel Messi during Barcelona training in August
footballPete Jenson co-ghost wrote Suarez’s autobiography and reveals how desperate he's been to return
News
newsMcKamey Manor says 'there is no escape until the tour is completed'
Voices
Hunted: A stag lies dead on Jura, where David Cameron holidays and has himself stalked deer
voicesThe Scotland I know is becoming a playground for the rich
News
people
PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
Architect Frank Gehry is regarded by many as the most important architect of the modern era
arts + entsGehry has declared that 98 per cent of modern architecture is "s**t"
Money
Welcome to tinsel town: retailers such as Selfridges will be Santa's little helpers this Christmas, working hard to persuade shoppers to stock up on gifts
news
Arts and Entertainment
Soul singer Sam Smith cleared up at the Mobo awards this week
newsSam Smith’s Mobo triumph is just the latest example of a trend
News
Laurence Easeman and Russell Brand
people
Sport
Fans of Dulwich Hamlet FC at their ground Champion Hill
footballFans are rejecting the £2,000 season tickets, officious stewarding, and airline-stadium sponsorship
News
Shami Chakrabarti
people
Arts and Entertainment
Benedict Cumberbatch has refused to deny his involvement in the upcoming new Star Wars film
filmBenedict Cumberbatch reignites Star Wars 7 rumours
Sport
football
News
news
Property search
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Business Analyst - Surrey - Permanent - Up to £50k DOE

£40000 - £50000 Per Annum Excellent benefits: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd:...

***ASP.NET Developer - Cheshire - £35k - Permanent***

£30000 - £35000 Per Annum Excellent benefits: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd:...

***Solutions Architect*** - Brighton - £40k - Permanent

£35000 - £40000 Per Annum Excellent benefits: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd:...

Senior Research Fellow in Gender, Food and Resilient Communities

£47,334 - £59,058 per annum: Coventry University: The Centre for Agroecology, ...

Day In a Page

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news: musician splits with manager after police investigate assault claims

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news

Former Dr Feelgood splits with manager after police investigate assault claims
Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands ahead of the US midterm elections

Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands

The Senator for Colorado is for gay rights, for abortion rights – and in the Republicans’ sights as they threaten to take control of the Senate next month
New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

Evidence found of contact between Easter Islanders and South America
Cerys Matthews reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of Dylan Thomas

Cerys Matthews on Dylan Thomas

The singer reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of the famous Welsh poet
DIY is not fun and we've finally realised this as a nation

Homebase closures: 'DIY is not fun'

Homebase has announced the closure of one in four of its stores. Nick Harding, who never did know his awl from his elbow, is glad to see the back of DIY
The Battle of the Five Armies: Air New Zealand releases new Hobbit-inspired in-flight video

Air New Zealand's wizard in-flight video

The airline has released a new Hobbit-inspired clip dubbed "The most epic safety video ever made"
Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month - but can you stomach the sweetness?

Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month

The combination of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg (and no actual pumpkin), now flavours everything from lattes to cream cheese in the US
11 best sonic skincare brushes

11 best sonic skincare brushes

Forget the flannel - take skincare to the next level by using your favourite cleanser with a sonic facial brush
Paul Scholes column: I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Phil Jones and Marcos Rojo

Paul Scholes column

I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Jones and Rojo
Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

While other sports are stalked by corruption, we are an easy target for the critics
Jamie Roberts exclusive interview: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Jamie Roberts: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Wales centre says he’s not coming home but is looking to establish himself at Racing Métro
How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?

A crime that reveals London's dark heart

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?
Meet 'Porridge' and 'Vampire': Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker

Lost in translation: Western monikers

Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker. Simon Usborne, who met a 'Porridge' and a 'Vampire' while in China, can see the problem
Handy hacks that make life easier: New book reveals how to rid your inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone

Handy hacks that make life easier

New book reveals how to rid your email inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone with a loo-roll
KidZania lets children try their hands at being a firefighter, doctor or factory worker for the day

KidZania: It's a small world

The new 'educational entertainment experience' in London's Shepherd's Bush will allow children to try out the jobs that are usually undertaken by adults, including firefighter, doctor or factory worker