Offers over £150,000 (sea view included)

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The Independent Online

The Grade II-listed building has uninterrupted sea views from all five floors and offers its very own two-ton lens. For the adventurous house-hunter, the Old Lighthouse at Dungeness in Kent has it all for £150,000.

The Grade II-listed building has uninterrupted sea views from all five floors and offers its very own two-ton lens. For the adventurous house-hunter, the Old Lighthouse at Dungeness in Kent has it all for £150,000.

The lighthouse was decommissioned in 1961 because the new Dungeness nuclear power station built just yards away obscured the view of some of its light from the sea.

The 135ft lighthouse, with a diameter of 36ft, has sweeping views from all five of its mezzanine floors, which are linked by a central concrete staircase. Its walls are engraved with the points of the compass and the massive clockwork Fresnel lens remains.

And the lighthouse has a proud place in British filmmaking history. Ken Russell used it as a location, and Derek Jarman lived his final days close by. The imposing structure has been a feature of the flat, windswept south-west Kent coast for more than 100 years, its beacon providing reassurance for many generations of ships in the busy English Channel.

Savills, the estate agents handling the sale, point out the potential of the building, which is now a museum. The previous owner, James Stanners, bought the lighthouse on a whim, having gone to an auction with the intention of buying a vintage Rolls-Royce.

But there is one major drawback to the deal: there have been two applications for planning permission to turn it into a home, both of which have been refused by Shepway District Council. There is mains water, electricity, private drainage and even night storage heaters.

But there is little hope of achieving planning permission in the near future. The allure, said Helga Jedrej of Savills, is in its individuality. "It's about having something that is part of history. That is not going to change and that is a unique part of the English heritage."

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