Australia batsman David Warner admits punching Joe Root and is suspended until first Ashes Test

Warner has been suspended after 'attacking' English batsman Joe Root

The Australian cricketer David Warner has been suspended until the first Ashes Test for attacking Joe Root in a pub.

Warner took part in a disciplinary hearing with Cricket Australia's behaviour commissioner, the Hon Justice Gordon Lewis, via teleconference this morning during which he pleased guilty.

The punishment means he will miss the rest of the Champions Trophy, although he escapes being sent home for the summer in shame. He was also fined 11,500 Australian dollars (almost £7,000) for the incident.

The decision leaves Australia in a tricky situation with the return of Warner for the first Ashes Test at Trent Bridge next month sure to be a distraction from their preparations.

The batsman was pulled out of yesterday's Champions Trophy match with New Zealand after it emerged he had attacked English cricketer Root in a Walkabout  sports bar in Birmingham following England's victory over Australia at Edgbaston on Saturday.

Warner has been charged with breaking governing body's code of conduct regarding "unbecoming behaviour" as the media reported that the batsman struck Root.

The 26-year-old Warner has been in trouble with Australian cricketing authorities and was last month fined £3,700 for a foul-mouthed tweet exchange with two Australian journalists.

CA recently banned four players - including vice-captain Shane Watson - from a Test against India for failing to complete a homework assignment.

Warner was, however, seen publicly warming up with teammates yesterday in Edgbaston , as well as carrying drinks as the twelfth man, mitigating rumours that he would be sent home to Austalia.

Australia captain George Bailey, who unintentionally had reporters chuckling when he claimed Warner had taken news of his dropping "on the chin", also attempted to make light of the situation.

"It's disappointing from my point of view, but it's a very minor incident and it's being dealt with in-house," he told the Press Association.

"I really enjoy playing cricket with him (Warner). I love his enthusiasm, I love his energy, I love the way he plays. I'm looking forward to hopefully playing a lot more with him in whatever career I have."

The tone of the England and Wales Cricket Board's official statement was significantly harsher.

It read: "The ECB confirms that David Warner initiated an unprovoked physical attack on a member of the England team in a Birmingham bar following England's 48-run victory over Australia.

"Warner has admitted behaving inappropriately and has since apologised to the player involved who has accepted the apology.

"Following a full investigation the England team management has concluded that the England player was in no way responsible for nor retaliated to the attack."

Root, who came away from the incident with no injuries, seemed fine as he trained with England teammates at the Kia Oval yesterday. Captain Alastair Cook publicly gave his batsman his backing and had no issue with his players celebrating a win in a bar.

"We had two days off as a team. When the schedule allows and when it's within certain parameters it's good to let your hair down," said Cook.

"We are clearly disappointed that the incident has happened, but after investigating it from our side, we don't believe we have done anything wrong.

"It was unfortunate but he (Root) wants to put it behind him."

A statement released on behalf of Walkabout suggested none of the players had been drinking excessively and that Warner, who was said to be known to staff at the venue, paid the bar tab.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue
E L James's book Grey is a reminder of how the phenomenon of the best-seller works

Grey is a reminder of how the phenomenon of the best-seller works

It's hard to understand why so many are buying it – but then best-selling was ever an inexact science, says DJ Taylor
Behind the scenes of the world's most experimental science labs

World's most experimental science labs

The photographer Daniel Stier has spent four years gaining access to some of the world's most curious scientific experiments
It's the stroke of champions - so why is the single-handed backhand on the way out?

Single-handed backhand: on the way out?

If today's young guns wish to elevate themselves to the heights of Sampras, Graf and Federer, it's time to fire up the most thrilling shot in tennis
HMS Saracen: Meeting the last survivor of a submarine found 72 years after it was scuttled

HMS Saracen

Meeting the last survivor of a submarine found 72 years after it was scuttled
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Martine Wright lost both legs in the attack – she explains how her experience since shows 'anything is possible'

7/7 bombings 10 years on

Martine Wright lost both legs in the attack – she explains how her experience since shows 'anything is possible'