Graeme Swann: This means far more to me than ‘tainted’ haul of 2010

 

Lord’s

Graeme Swann became the first England spinner to take five wickets in an Ashes Test at Lord’s for 79 years and admitted that he will cherish it far more than his “tainted” achievement in 2010.

Swann’s 5 for 44 in Australia’s first innings helped England bowl out the tourists for 128, and made them favourites to win this match. Even though Peter Siddle removed Alastair Cook, Jonathan Trott and Kevin Pietersen before the close, England lead by 264, with seven second- innings wickets still intact.

Swann will have to take all 10 wickets when Australia bat again to match the achievement of Hedley Verity, who collected 15 in the match in 1934. Yet this means more to Swann than his 5 for 62 against Pakistan here three years ago, in the game that would be remembered for the spot-fixing scandal that led to prison sentences for Salman Butt, Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir.

“I was on the honours board once before against Pakistan in a game that was tainted, so to get my name there in an Ashes Test is a boyhood dream,” said Swann, who spent  time off the field before lunch after being struck on the right forearm while batting.

The blow was in a similar spot to the one inflicted by Tymal Mills during England’s warm-up match against Essex, and Swann admitted: “There was a bit of a worry in the first two or three overs I bowled.

“There was not a great deal of feeling and I had a few problems gripping the ball, but they disappeared after I took my second wicket.

 “It was a strange day, one of those where wickets fall (16 in total) and you’re happy to be on the bowling side for most of them. We thought 400 was about par and we reluctantly accepted 361, so it was fantastic to bowl out Australia for a total so far below ours.

“But Australia bounced back well in the evening and that will have  buoyed them. We need to regroup again – just as we did in the first innings when we were 28 for 3.”

It was a day on which batsmen often gave away their wickets, the symbol of which was Swann’s  outrageous leg-before decision against Chris Rogers – from a waist-high full toss. Rogers somehow missed the ball and to complete his misery, replays showed the Australia opener would have been reprieved had he chosen to refer the decision. Swann smiled: “I’m not sure there has been a worse piece of cricket in Test history.”

It was no laughing matter for the tourists’ coach, Darren Lehmann, who said “I need a beer” to an Australian colleague as he prepared to face journalists’ questions.

“It was a bad day,” he admitted. “We didn’t bat well and our referrals could have been better. We’ve got the reviews right from the bowling side, but now the batsmen need to do it better. It was more one-day batting than Test batting and we need to learn from our mistakes. ”

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn