Vaughan handed central deal

Former captain Michael Vaughan was today named among a dozen England players to be centrally-contracted for the next year.

Vaughan, 33, was rewarded with a 12-month deal despite his lack of form for Yorkshire since relinquishing the Test leadership last month.



Only Michael Atherton captained England on more occasions than the 51 Vaughan managed and no-one comes close in terms of Test wins as skipper.



When he announced his decision to step down from the job, he emphasised his need to justify his place as a batsman, but has since failed four times in County Championship innings.



Nevertheless, he clearly remains in the plans of new captain Kevin Pietersen and national selector Geoff Miller today confirmed Vaughan's award at a press conference at Lord's.



"The award of an England central contract to Michael Vaughan reflects the selectors' view that Michael still has a role to play in the England Test squad over the next 12 months," Miller said.



"As we build toward the Ashes in 2009, we feel that Michael's experience of previous Ashes campaigns and his excellent personal record against Australia will be an important asset to the squad."



Vaughan was man of the series during the 2002-03 Ashes defeat and led his country to the most memorable of wins over the Australians in 2005.



The only change in the group of centrally-controlled players, in fact, comes in the bowling department with Vaughan's Yorkshire team-mate Matthew Hoggard being replaced by Nottinghamshire's Stuart Broad.



"Stuart has made rapid progress over the past year and adapted extremely well to the challenges of both Test and one-day international cricket," Miller added.



Seven players - Tim Ambrose, Ravi Bopara, Samit Patel, Matt Prior, Owais Shah, Graeme Swann and Luke Wright - have been awarded England 'increment' contracts for the same period.



These replace previous summer deals for those individuals pinpointed for international action.



They will be primarily paid by their counties but receive a top-up payment from the ECB.



Others may also earn the extra payment as the increment system includes a point-scoring facet to reward appearances from this winter onwards.



Non-contracted players will be awarded five points for a Test appearance and two for a Twenty20 or ODI appearance and the accumulation of 20 points during a 12-month period will result in automatic qualification for the financial prize.



Hugh Morris, managing director England cricket, said: "The introduction of the new England Increment Contracts is designed primarily to reward players who feature regularly in the England one-day side. "The creation of a points based system also provides the selectors with the flexibility to reward new players who break into the England Test or one-day teams during the contract period."



The 12 players that have been handed annual central contracts to run from October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2009 are:

JM Anderson, IR Bell, SCJ Broad, PD Collingwood, AN Cook, A Flintoff, SJ Harmison, MS Panesar, KP Pietersen, RJ Sidebottom, AJ Strauss, MP Vaughan.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003