Cycling World Cup: GB women smash own pursuit record – twice

 

Sports News Correspondent

“Let’s go faster,” suggested Katie Archibald, the newest addition to the women’s team pursuit line-up when questioned as to their ambition in Mexico this week at the second leg of the World Cup. And Archibald and her team-mates, Jo Rowsell, Dani King and Elinor Barker, have done exactly that.

The British quartet twice lowered their own world record in sweeping to another gold medal in Aguascalientes; they have now shaved over 10 seconds off the mark in the last two months and this latest low was achieved without the aid of multiple world and Olympic champion Laura Trott.

The evening before the race, the squad shared a cake to mark Rowsell’s birthday. At 25, she is the elder stateswoman of the quintet, with Archibald and Barker both still in their teens. Sir Dave Brailsford has already marked them down as Britain’s star act on the road to Rio 2016 and they are setting off down it at a rare pace.

Yesterday they won the final against Canada in 4min  16.552sec, three seconds quicker than Trott, Rowsell, Barker and King had ridden in winning the opening World Cup in Manchester last month and some 10 seconds swifter than Trott, Rowsell, Barker and Archibald had recorded in winning the European Championships in Apeldoorn earlier in November.

With Aguascalientes sitting over 1,800m above sea level, world records were expected at this World Cup – the German men’s and women’s sprint teams also set new marks – but the manner in which the British pursuit team are getting quicker, despite not having settled on their premier line-up and not being in peak condition, is remarkable.

Yesterday they were 4.8sec slower than the Italian men’s team; they have been set a target of breaking the four-minute, 10-second barrier by the Rio Games and come next year’s world championships in Cali, Colombia, another venue at altitude, they may well be going quicker than some of their male counterparts.

The women’s pursuit was upped from three riders riding three kilometres to four doing four in February. It was an event Britain dominated before the switch but at the moment the rest simply cannot compete with their depth. In the final Canada finished seven seconds adrift, unable to come anywhere near their promising semi-final time of 4:19.629 in the face of Britain’s relentless riding.

It was Britain’s only gold of the opening night. Germany underlined their dominance of the sprints, beating Britain into silver in both the men’s and women’s races. Kian Emadi, Philip Hindes and Jason Kenny broke the world record in qualifying but the Germans responded by going even faster in their first ride and then were too quick for Britain in the final.

Becky James and Jess Varnish also failed to keep up with the Germans as the formidable Kristina Vogel, becoming  the dominant force in women’s sprinting, and Miriam Welte took their second gold of the World Cup series. In the men’s pursuit an experimental and youthful line-up of Owain Doull, Steve Burke and Sam Harrison took bronze.

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive - OTE £45,000

£18000 - £45000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Sales Executive is required t...

Recruitment Genius: Test Development Engineer

£35000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Are you inspired to bring new a...

Recruitment Genius: Trainee Motor Engineer

£14000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Technical Administrator

£15000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This company are a world leadin...

On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?
Big knickers are back: Thongs ain't what they used to be

Thongs ain't what they used to be

Big knickers are back
Thurston Moore interview

Thurston Moore interview

On living in London, Sonic Youth and musical memoirs
In full bloom

In full bloom

Floral print womenswear
From leading man to Elephant Man, Bradley Cooper is terrific

From leading man to Elephant Man

Bradley Cooper is terrific
In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

Dame Colette Bowe - interview
When do the creative juices dry up?

When do the creative juices dry up?

David Lodge thinks he knows
The 'Cher moment' happening across fashion just now

Fashion's Cher moment

Ageing beauty will always be more classy than all that booty
Thousands of teenage girls enduring debilitating illnesses after routine school cancer vaccination

Health fears over school cancer jab

Shock new Freedom of Information figures show how thousands of girls have suffered serious symptoms after routine HPV injection
Fifa President Sepp Blatter warns his opponents: 'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

Fifa president Sepp Blatter issues defiant warning to opponents
Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report

Weather warning

Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report
LSD: Speaking to volunteer users of the drug as trials get underway to see if it cures depression and addiction

High hopes for LSD

Meet the volunteer users helping to see if it cures depression and addiction
German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians

Saving Private Brandt

A Belgian museum's display of the skeleton of a soldier killed at Waterloo prompts calls for him to be given a dignified funeral