Edwards left rueful but in good heart

Athletics

Britain's new world record holder, Jonathan Edwards, experienced a familiar sensation at the Bupa International at the Don Valley Stadium, Sheffield, yesterday. Once again, he triple jumped over 18 metres. Once again, the following wind - illegally strong at 2.5 metres per second - denied him the effort for record purposes.

His initial reaction on surveying his mark in the sand at 18.08 was to leap up and punch the air. But within seconds the bad news was shouted out to him and he was holding his head in his hands while smiling ruefully. His fourth 18 metres jump within a month - and still he must content himself with the legal mark of 17.98 metres which he set in Salamanca on Tuesday.

If there was frustration for Edwards on the day, however, his overall emotion as he approaches next month's World Championships is one of excitement. It is an emotion that can be justifiably shared by several other British athletes.

Like Edwards, Linford Christie was also denied a world best by the wind. His time of 14.74sec in the rarely run 150 metres - inside Pietro Mennea's 12-year-old mark of 14.8sec - was rendered illegal by a reading of three metres per second.

But Christie will not worry about that. It was an impressive and timely run which left a high quality field trailing. Among his opponents was John Regis and Donovan Bailey, the Canadian who tops the season's 100m rankings with 9.91sec.

The wind could not frustrate two other British record-breaking performances. In a pole vault competition that took place in front of a couple of hundred spectators after the main meeting had finished, 22-year-old Nick Buckfield set a new mark of 5.70 metres.

Keith Stock's mark of 5.65 has thus been superseded after 14 years. And Buckfield, Britain's only representative in the event in Gothenburg, will travel in expectation as well as hope, having improved by 29 centimetres this season.

Kelly Holmes re-emphasised her claims in the 800 and 1500 metres with a British record of 2min 32.82sec in the 1,000 metres.

Steve Backley, one of a number of athletes whose status in the British World Championship team will shift from provisional to definite in an announcement today, presented a buoyant figure after winning the javelin with a throw of 86.30m.

The double European and Commonwealth champion has now established a consistency which has escaped him in past years, and his general fitness has been improved by the attentions of a South African medical expert, Dr Ron Holder, who has been working on improving the general balance of his body by placing support pads in strategic places within Backley's shoes.

The pads themselves, though carefully calculated in effect, consist of leaves of Yellow Pages directories taped together.

They also have been of assistance this season to Roger Black, another athlete being advised by Holder. But Black, who equalled his lifetime 400 metres best of 44.59sec earlier this month, was relatively depressed after a time of 45.54.

The prospects for Britain's middle distance performance in Gothenburg have been brightened by the recent form of Curtis Robb and John Mayock. Robb earned a bold 800 metres victory while Mayock held off Rob Denmark in a sprint finish to the 3,000 metres.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?