Ribery wants Bayern future decided

Franck Ribery has not ruled out committing himself to a new contract with Bayern Munich, although he wants his future decided before the World Cup.

The France international is currently tied to the Bundesliga club until 2011 and negotiations over an extension are due to take place in the near future.

Bayern's president Uli Hoeness has already admitted that Ribery may have to be sold next summer if he does not sign a new contract since he would be available for free 12 months later and Bayern "cannot afford to throw 50 to 60 million euros away".

Real Madrid have already signalled their interest in the winger, but they may have to wait after the player hinted that a move in the summer is not such a foregone conclusion.

"The decision is up to me," he said at Bayern's winter training camp in Dubai today.

"It is possible that I extend my contract. Why not?

"There will definitely be talks with me and my agent and FC Bayern. I think everything will be sorted before the World Cup."

Ribery missed much of the first half of the season due to a succession of injuries and his luck has not turned in 2010 either as he needed to remove an accumulation of blood from both of his big toes after his first workout of the year.

He is still a doubt for Bayern's first match of the new year against Hoffenheim a week on Friday, but he is itching to get back onto the field.

"I hope to be back in the squad to face Hoffenheim and obviously I hope to play too," he said.

"I have been thinking a lot about the second half of the season because it is going to be very important for me and the club.

"Therefore, I hope I soon get better. I am not in my best form at the moment because I cannot really train.

"I feel good at times, and then bad again. I just hope I can recover soon."

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