I'd love to manage England at the Euros, says Pearce

Caretaker coach names young squad and says his tournament experience would help him in Poland and Ukraine this summer

The England caretaker manager, Stuart Pearce, yesterday put himself in the frame to take the job for Euro 2012 this summer – although not beyond that – should the Football Association fail to appoint a new man in time.

Pearce, 49, who announced his squad for the friendly against the Netherlands at Wembley on Wednesday, said that he accepted that he did not have the track record to get the England manager's job on a full-time basis but added that his tournament experience made him a candidate to remain in charge for the European Championship.

Currently the manager of the Under-21s, whom he has taken to three European championships, and the prospective coach of Team GB at the London Olympics, Pearce said that he had told the FA he was ready to take the job for the summer. Harry Redknapp remains the runaway favourite to succeed Fabio Capello on a permanent basis although a move for him is not without potential problems.

The surprise inclusion in the squad was the Sunderland striker Fraizer Campbell, one of two uncapped names among the 25 along with Manchester United's Tom Cleverley. Pearce also recalled Micah Richards, out of favour under Capello. Otherwise it was more about the omissions, who included Frank Lampard, Rio Ferdinand, Michael Carrick, Andy Carroll, Joleon Lescott and Peter Crouch.

Pearce said that he had spoken to all those individuals left out – and had visited one in person – to tell them that he wanted to give some of the less experienced players a chance. He said he was eager that that Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain should be allowed to develop in the Under-21s first and the Arsenal winger is in their squad, who will be joined by Everton's Phil Neville on the coaching staff as he prepares for his career after playing, to face Belgium next week.

On his willingness to coach the senior team at Euro 2012, Pearce said that he had outlined his ambitions to the Club England director Trevor Brooking. "I would be the first person to say this [permanent] job is for a very experienced manager and someone with a better CV than I have. I have been asked to do the job next week. I have also said to the federation [FA] I would be more than happy to take the team to the tournament.

"I feel as though I have enough experience. I have been to semi-finals as a player. I have been to tournaments and reached finals and semi-finals with the Under-21s. I have been to South Africa with Fabio. I have enough tournament experience. It would be an absolute honour and a pleasure.

"I don't think at this moment in time I've got the experience to be the full-time England manager, so my run would end in the summer. But someone on the football side has to be planning and that's why I've been in the building over the last five years, for situations like this when someone has to step into the breach. I'll give my recommendations.

"[I am] a candidate who has some form of experience and won't go to a tournament having never been to a tournament at any level. That is the only thing I can offer. Obviously I can offer myself as a coach that a lot of these players know and I played alongside some of them, the likes of Frank Lampard, Rio Ferdinand were team-mates of mine at the back end of my career.

"Tournament football does stand alone a little bit in respect to club football. Fabio found out one or two things you do slightly different. What we have to make sure is the next man through the door has as much education."

On the captaincy, Pearce said that he would make a decision having observed the group which meets on Sunday. He said that when it came to the criteria for the decision, he was reminded of a speech he gave to soldiers in Afghanistan last year.

"On the trip over there I thought, 'Well, how do I approach this? What key element do I believe would be fundamental in a leader?' And that would be 'unselfish'. That's the one word I could come up with.

"Your team-mates have to know you're in this for their greater good, rather than your own. I will attempt to pick a captain next week who I believe has that sort of respect in the other players' eyes."

Pearce added in a separate interview that he believed that the attention placed upon the captaincy, a role he performed for his country as a player, had been "off the Richter scale" in the last few months.

The likelihood is that Steven Gerrard will captain the side for what will potentially be his first appearance for England since the France friendly in November 2010. Pearce has also selected Wayne Rooney despite the Manchester United striker being suspended for the first two games of Euro 2012. He was concerned the player would otherwise have been out of international football for nine months by the time he is available to face Ukraine on 19 June, in the third group game. Rooney will play some part on Wednesday, he said.

Pearce conceded that whatever happens in the next four months, the "expectation ... will be slightly out of tilt with reality" come Euro 2012. He said: "I don't want to play down our chances of winning anything, I wouldn't do that, but trophy cabinets don't lie. At all age groups. Now you look at ours, 1966 was the last time we pulled a trophy out. Whether I like it as an Englishman or not, that is a fact."

'Psycho' full of regret for Ince racial abuse

Stuart Pearce said yesterday that he was a changed man from the individual who had to apologise to Paul Ince for racially abusing him during a game between Nottingham Forest and Manchester United in 1994.

In front of the television cameras, Pearce had accused newspapers of "rehashing" the story but later he admitted that he "regretted" what he said to Ince. Asked whether it was a one-off mistake, Pearce replied "I believe so".

"It was something that I apologised for at the time," he said. "Society has changed a great deal certainly over the years. A lot more is being done especially in our profession – and rightly so – in regard to anti-racism.

"In regard to the incident, myself and Paul have no ill feeling towards each other. We competed in Euro '96 together, four months ago I sat next to his wife watching his son Tom playing at West Ham in my capacity as Under-21 manager.

"There's no ill feeling there but it's certainly something I regretted at the time. What you were and what you've said 17 years ago is certainly no reflection of what you've said today as a man... It's very disappointing, I think it's important that I draw a line under it and we move on from there."

Sam Wallace

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch
Dame Harriet Walter: The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment

Dame Harriet Walter interview

The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment
Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Critics of Tom Stoppard's new play seem to agree that cerebral can never trump character, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's winter salads will make you feel energised through February

Bill Granger's winter salads

Salads aren't just a bit on the side, says our chef - their crunch, colour and natural goodness are perfect for a midwinter pick-me-up
England vs Wales: Cool head George Ford ready to put out dragon fire

George Ford: Cool head ready to put out dragon fire

No 10’s calmness under pressure will be key for England in Cardiff
Michael Calvin: Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links