Volunteer fans dress up for the show

World Cup Diary
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The Independent Football

* A strange sight at World Cup venues are the groups of Koreans supporting other countries. They occupy a block of the stadium in the nation's colours, from replica kit to face-paint, and maintain a stream of songs and formation lurching movements reminiscent of Status Quo circa Paper Plane. Turkey have attracted a high number of volunteers, around 10,000, in honour of the Turks who died fighting during the Korean War. Meanwhile, interest in the World Cup has hit the number of Koreans going to the cinema. Figures are well down on normal, hitting a low during France v Senegal.

* A strange sight at World Cup venues are the groups of Koreans supporting other countries. They occupy a block of the stadium in the nation's colours, from replica kit to face-paint, and maintain a stream of songs and formation lurching movements reminiscent of Status Quo circa Paper Plane. Turkey have attracted a high number of volunteers, around 10,000, in honour of the Turks who died fighting during the Korean War. Meanwhile, interest in the World Cup has hit the number of Koreans going to the cinema. Figures are well down on normal, hitting a low during France v Senegal.

* Brazil were not the only ones who got out of jail on Monday. In an scene straight out of a spaghetti western, 17 inmates tunneled out of a São Paulo prison during the game with Turkey while associates distracted warders by firing guns outside. Two escapees were shot dead, putting the Turkish FA president's claim that the referee had "killed 70 million Turks" into perspective.

* England can pack their bags and come home now, according to an internet fortune-teller. The website www.leemancy.com, which uses the Asian science of divination, predicts they will not survive the first round. South Korea will progress, it predicts, beating Poland (which they did) as will the US while drawing with Portugal. (Well, it can't be right all the time).

* Several hundred fans in Belarus demonstrated in Minsk to demand World Cup coverage. Belarus television has not bought the rights, believing the games would be shown by stations in neighbouring Russia. But Russian channels are not allowed to broadcast outside their borders, and fans took to the streets shouting: "They are stealing our soccer. Down with the regime!"

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