Burns advocates reduced role for Premier League

Burns, who since January has been compiling his root-and-branch structural review of the game's governing body, published his findings yesterday and challenged those who might be affected to accept the changes.

The board of the FA currently comprises four representatives from Premiership clubs out of 12 members but under Burns' proposals, that number would drop to two.

That will frustrate the Premier League's board members in the FA who would like the process to go the other way in order to take greater control of matters such as the new Wembley Stadium and the England team. Burns' suggestions include the introduction of non-executive independent directors on the board, at the expense of both Premier and Football League members, as well as the possibility of the chairman of the FA being an independent director.

But Burns denied this was about anyone losing out in a race for power. He said: "I don't accept that the Premier League will be special losers here. We all want a successful Premier League but we must accept you need a governing body of football and they cannot be their own governing body.

"I would say you will find they agree with me that we want to see a strong Premier League and a strong FA where people respect its decisions, its authority and the way it conducts the roles of a governing body."

Despite his proposals, the Premier League offered its backing, saying: "The board of the Premier League welcomes the publication of Lord Burns' review. Clearly we will have to take time to discuss its content with our member clubs. We have been impressed with Lord Burns' approach to this matter. Whilst it is improbable that all of us will agree with the review in its entirety, the Premier League [board] will be encouraging its clubs to support the key recommendations."

Burns also suggested that the FA create a semi-autonomous Regulation and Compliance Unit to handle matters such as discipline both on and off the pitch and that this unit show greater openness than ever before, throwing open the possibility of club disputes being aired publicly.

However, Burns' review, which will now be considered by the FA over the coming months, could hit a stumbling block when it comes to voting his measures through, as any changes need a 75 per cent majority. If successful, he said he would like his changes to take effect over the next three years with visible progress from next year.

Burns also received support from Richard Caborn, the Sports Minister, who said: "The FA needs to become a flexible, responsive and more authoritative voice for football fit for the 21st and not the 19th century. I congratulate them for identifying the need to modernise and this report provides the foundation for real progress to be made."

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Revealed: Why Mohammed Emwazi chose the 'safe option' of fighting for Isis, rather than following his friends to al-Shabaab in Somalia

Why Mohammed Emwazi chose Isis

His friends were betrayed and killed by al-Shabaab
'The solution can never be to impassively watch on while desperate people drown'
An open letter to David Cameron: Building fortress Europe has had deadly results

Open letter to David Cameron

Building the walls of fortress Europe has had deadly results
Tory candidates' tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they seem - you don't say!

You don't say!

Tory candidates' election tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they appear
Mubi: Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash

So what is Mubi?

Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash all the time
The impossible job: how to follow Kevin Spacey?

The hardest job in theatre?

How to follow Kevin Spacey
Armenian genocide: To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie

Armenian genocide and the 'good Turks'

To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie
Lou Reed: The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond the biographers' and memoirists' myths

'Lou needed care, but what he got was ECT'

The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond
Migrant boat disaster: This human tragedy has been brewing for four years and EU states can't say they were not warned

This human tragedy has been brewing for years

EU states can't say they were not warned
Women's sportswear: From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help

Women's sportswear

From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help
Hillary Clinton's outfits will be as important as her policies in her presidential bid

Clinton's clothes

Like it or not, her outfits will be as important as her policies
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders