FA chairman Greg Dyke unveils 'League Three' proposal and plans to deal with 'mediocre' foreign players

New league for Premier League B teams is one of the proposals included in the findings of the 'FA Chairman's England Commission'

The Football Association chairman Greg Dyke today called for English football to get behind his plans for a new "League Three" for Premier League B-teams that would sit beneath League Two in the football pyramid, in one of the most radical shake-ups to the national game.

The FA has released the findings of the "FA Chairman's England Commission", set up by Dyke to look into why the number of English players in the Premier League and Championship is falling and what can be done about it. The most radical proposal is a new fifth-tier "League Three" with B-teams from Premier League sides which would be subject to promotion and relegation.

Dyke says in the report that he wants the number of English players playing regularly in the Premier League to increase from 66, its current level, to 90 by 2022. He said the declining numbers of homegrown players "is a problem in countries right across Europe but is a significantly bigger problem in England than anywhere else and if the trend continues we fear for the future of the England team. If this cannot be reversed a future England manager will have fewer and fewer top level English players from which to choose."

On his proposals he said: "We recognise that making changes in football is often a slow and difficult process but we urge those in the football world to consider our proposals constructively and with open minds.

"We urge them to balance the specific, narrowly-defined concerns of their particular club or league with what will be of the most benefit to the game overall, to the development of young English players and to the success of the England team."

Under the recommendations of the report, which claims to have canvassed the views of 650 individuals involved with football in England, Premier League clubs would be able to choose whether they wanted their B-team to start in the new League Three or the Conference. They would be subject to promotion and relegation but would not be permitted to rise above League One and would not play in the FA Cup.

 

Under Dyke's Commission proposals, each team would include 15 English players which he says would, in a ten-team league, give "150 playing opportunities for English players". The report says: "If we assume that the percentage of these that make it into the first team is around six per cent (a marginal improvement on the percentage of players with loan experience that reach the first team) this would translate into nine new English players making it into the first team squad of a Premier League side each season."

The England manager Roy Hodgson also leant his support to the proposals. He said that "everyone who is passionate about English football would strong advocate the findings and recommendations ... we all have a responsibility when called to answer the question, how can we provide a better platform for the young English players of the future."

England manager Roy Hodgson supports the proposals England manager Roy Hodgson supports the proposals  

The Commission report also recommends the formalising of agreements between partner clubs, like Tottenham Hotspur and Swindon Town. Under the proposed "Strategic Loan Partnership" (SLP) the Commission says that the "lending club would be able to guide the loaned player's experience more closely". Premier League and Championship clubs would be able to sign SLPs with up to two clubs in divisions beneath the Championship.

The places on the SLP would be for home grown players only, and the Commission estimates that 65 per cent of those players would be English. Under the agreement senior clubs could lend up to eight players in a season although only five could be on the team sheet of the receiving club at any one time. They would also be able to loan coaches and backroom staff including sports scientists to their partner clubs.

In return, for the benefits for the Premier League and Championship clubs, Dyke proposes a financial "settlement" as a "counterbalance" although he is vague as to how this might be achieved.

The Commission also address what is says are "mediocre players" from outside the European Union obtaining Home Office work permits to play. It says that 122 non-EU players have come onto the country since 2009 of which 50 per cent did not meet the criteria for a permit. The appeal system has a 79 per cent success rate yet only 55 per cent going into the Premier League played less than the average minutes of a Premier League player. Only 58 per cent given work visas for the Premier League played a second season of football in the top flight. 

Voices
voices
News
general electionThis quiz matches undecided voters with the best party for them
Arts and Entertainment
Keira Knightley and Matthew Macfadyen starred in the big screen adaptation of Austen's novel in 2005
tvStar says studios are forcing actors to get buff for period roles
News
science
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before