Bolton re-schedule Tottenham FA Cup tie following Fabrice Muamba collapse

 

Bolton have re-arranged their abandoned FA Cup match with Tottenham.

The two Premier League sides will meet at White Hart Lane on Tuesday. It was also announced earlier today that Bolton's Premier League match with Blackburn this Saturday will also go ahead.

There had been question marks over the two fixtures following Fabrice Muamba's cardiac arrest. The Bolton midfielder collapsed on the White Hart Lane pitch shortly before half-time in the Sixth Round tie on Saturday.

The 23-year-old was treated on the pitch, where efforts were made to restart his heart. He was then rushed to the London Chest Hospital, where he remains.

Reports since the incident on Saturday have seen Muamba make quicker progress than anyone had dared hope. The Zaire born player has been 'laughing and joking' with friends and moving his arms and legs.

This afternoon former Arsenal team-mate Thierry Henry visited the London hospital, the latest in a string of football superstars eager to pass on their best wishes to the former England under-21 captain.

Despite the signs of recovery, the hospital has warned it will be some time before the long term effects of the dramatic events at the weekend will be known.

Bolton team doctor Jonathan Tobin, who treated Muamba before his arrival at hospital, spoke for the first time today. He told how he worked for 48 minutes on the midfielder before he arrived at hospital and that Muamba continued to receive treatment for another 30 minutes before his heart showed signs of activity.

"In effect he was dead in that time," Dr Tobin said. "Fabrice was in a type of cardiac arrest where the heart is showing lots of electrical activity but no muscular activity.

"It's something that often responds to drugs and shocks.

"Now heaven knows why, but Fabrice had, in total, 15 shocks. He had a further 12 shocks in the ambulance."

Tobin also described his feelings as the events unfolded.

"I can't begin to explain the pressure that was there," Tobin said. "This isn't somebody that's gone down in the street or been brought into A&E.

"This is somebody that I know, I know his family. This is somebody I consider a friend. This is somebody I joke with on a daily basis.

"As I was running onto the pitch I was thinking 'Oh my God, it's Fabrice'."

Dr Andrew Deaner, the cardiologist and Tottenham fan who came to Muamba's aid after watching the scene from the stands, has described the recovery as "miraculous".

Before making the decision to play Blackburn this weekend, Bolton Wanderers manager Owen Coyle asked his players if they wanted to go ahead with the match. Meanwhile, there were suggestions that Bolton would drop out of this year's FA Cup altogether, but it would seem that with the backdrop of Muamba's condition improving, the Bolton players felt ready to return to the scene of the dramatic events of Saturday.

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