David Moyes sacked: Moyes' departure continues alarming trend of rash sackings in the Premier League

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger has been in charge of the Gunners for near the same number of days as the other 19 clubs combined

David Moyes was sacked as manager of Manchester United on Tuesday morning, ending his 295-day reign at Old Trafford. In the end, it proved to be a 2-0 defeat to Everton that provided the final nail in his long-buried coffin, given that the decision was made to make do with his services back in February after the Champions League defeat to Olympiakos.

David Moyes sacked by Manchester United

Moyes’ exit comes as the latest sacking that has become normality in the Premier League. He becomes the 10th manager to exit a club in the top flight this season, breaking the record of nine set in 1994-95.

The Premier League managerial sack race this season reads: Paolo Di Canio (Sunderland), Ian Holloway (Crystal Palace), Andre Villas-Boas (Tottenham), Malky Mackay (Cardiff), Steve Clarke (West Brom), Michael Laudrup (Swansea), Martin Jol and Rene Meulensteen (both Fulham) and Chris Hughton (Norwich).

Decision to sack Moyes was made in February

With Ryan Giggs taking temporary control of United’s first-team responsibilities, it means that Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger’s record of 6,408 days in charge of the Gunners is nearly as many as the other 19 managers combined, as sport website Sporting Intelligence shows below.

Newcastle manager Alan Pardew, who only took over the Magpies in 2010, has the second longest current reign having been in charge for 1,229 days, and makes up a tally of 6,898 days of the remaining managers in the top flight – 490 more than 64-year-old Wenger.

Who will be the next United manager?

With Tim Sherwood expected to leave Tottenham at the end of the season, and a number of managers threatened with the axe should they succumb to relegation – which includes Cardiff’s Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, Sunderland’s Gus Poyet and Fulham’s Felix Magath – Wenger could very soon find himself with more experience than the rest of the Premier League put together.


The one saving grace? Leicester and Burnley will return to English footballs top tier next season having already secured promotion from the Championship, with Nigel Pearson and Sean Dyche having been in their respective roles for 888 and 539 days.