Fernando Torres wants time to settle at Chelsea

Fernando Torres insists it was always going to take him time to settle at Chelsea as his search for his first goal for the club continues.

Torres once again drew a blank in last night's dramatic Barclays Premier League win over Manchester United and has now gone four games without scoring since his record-breaking £50million move from Liverpool.

After missing a hatful of chances in his previous two matches against Fulham and FC Copenhagen, the striker did not see much of the ball in front of goal last night.

He did find the net with a stunning left-foot half-volley, but only after a free-kick had already been given against Chelsea.

Despite his travails, the 26-year-old appears unflustered by his current drought and confident the goals will flow once he adjusts to the Blues' style of play.

"It's important to understand the style of football your team is playing, how you are involved in the system and everything," Torres told Chelsea magazine.

"This always takes some time. But, I think, once you get it, everything becomes much easier.

"The important thing is to have different options in the way you play."

Torres was given free reign as a lone striker at Anfield but has yet to be indulged on that front by Chelsea boss Carlo Ancelotti, who has played him with a partner or in a three-man attack.

Torres said: "If you want to be a top player, you have to be able to play in all these situations and I'm sure here at Chelsea I will play in different positions sometimes.

"I'm ready for this because I want to play where the manager asks me to - I know the competition is high here."

Torres insists he never doubted he would be a success at Chelsea when he decided to leave Liverpool.

"I think when you make a decision this important you must be sure you can do it, otherwise it's not worth moving to a club like Chelsea," he said.

"You have to have confidence in yourself and you have to work harder than everyone else because you are the new player to arrive at the club.

"I have confidence in myself, I have confidence in this team and I have tried to become involved in everything this team is doing from the first day."

Revealing that first day was "similar to starting at school", he added: "You are always, not worried, but a bit shy when you arrive on the first day and you want to do many things - go here, go there, train well, meet everyone.

"But, here, the atmosphere was very good, they have made it very easy for me.

"For me, of course, it's very important to find a house or an apartment and bring my family to live here with me now.

"It's tough in the beginning when you are in a hotel and then you just go to the training ground.

"You haven't got a car or anything - you cannot live a normal life - so, obviously, it's different to what you're used to.

"Hopefully, I can find somewhere as soon as possible and I can start living here."

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