Players who transgress will face consequences

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The Independent Football

Newcastle United's players will have to "face the consequences" if the club's new manager, Graeme Souness, feels they are not sharing his passion for the challenge ahead, according to the former Newcastle favourite Chris Waddle.

Newcastle United's players will have to "face the consequences" if the club's new manager, Graeme Souness, feels they are not sharing his passion for the challenge ahead, according to the former Newcastle favourite Chris Waddle.

Souness has established a reputation as a disciplinarian. Waddle said: "He doesn't stand fools. If you break rules, if you step out of line, then obviously you face the consequences.

"A few players had a little too much space to do what they want and say what they want, definitely," Waddle said of the previous set-up at the club. "Too many players have had too much freedom of speech."

Roy Evans, who worked under the Scot at Liverpool in the early Nineties, paid tribute to Souness's enthusiasm for the game.

"Graeme's very passionate," he said. "He still plays five-a-side. At the end of the day he loves football and nothing will keep him away from that."

The Blackburn goalkeeper Brad Friedel wished his old manager good luck - and provided an alternative view of the fiery Scot.

"Everyone thinks he [Souness] is a big, hard man, but they won't see that up there," Friedel said. "He's more mellow and quiet than he used to be. But he will mould the team into the team he wants it to be."

Problem men: the players Souness must bring to heel

Craig Bellamy: Once threatened Newcastle's first-team coach, John Carver, to a fight in an airport, although his dentist would urge the Welsh international not to repeat the tactic with Souness. Has calmed down in recent months, although Sir Bobby Robson was angered by his threat to leave should Newcastle sign Wayne Rooney.

Kieron Dyer: The King of Bling's Hollywood lifestyle left a bitter taste in the Toon Army's mouth long before his refusal to play on the right. Dyer's problems are in his head; too much confidence, followed by too little, saddled by an inability to translate talent into performances.

Alan Shearer: It should not be forgotten that the captain was the first to contribute to the dressing-room unrest that undermined Sir Bobby Robson, saying he intended to start every game in his farewell season. Robson thought him a great player in decline but to challenge Shearer is to challenge the fabric of Newcastle.

Patrick Kluivert: Huge wages (£65,000 a week), seldom fully-fit, relentless party animal with an enormous ego. Souness must have thought he had got rid of Dwight Yorke. However, judging by his encouraging display at Aston Villa, Kluivert appears keen to fulfil his potential.

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