Redknapp rages at the officials after Stoke win

Stoke City 2 Tottenham Hotspur 1

The Britannia Stadium

Harry Redknapp has that habit of taking all the attention and it is certainly hard to ignore him when he's imagining how a linesman who has done his side a disservice might be spending the evening ahead. "He will watch it on TV when his wife's making him a bacon sandwich and he'll think, 'Oh fuck me, what have I done there?'" Redknapp imagined of Robert Pollock.

He had reason to feel aggrieved, though this day still belonged to players who have been forced to make a life away from White Hart Lane. There was no great fanfare or thank you when Peter Crouch left north London on deadline day this summer and when he stepped up to take his penalty in the shoot-out which eliminated Spurs from the Carling Cup in September, Redknapp shouted: "We know which side you go for." Crouch promptly converted and yesterday reinforced his own perception that he has always played his best football with a manager who rates him. Redknapp was not in that number, though Tony Pulis is. "Have a look at his stats," the Stoke manager quietly reflected of Crouch and to go with the effort of commitment that they revealed was some clever skill and control which helped him play a part in both Stoke goals.

The happy beneficiary was Matthew Etherington, released from Spurs far sooner on his road through football, and whose two goals - in a season when they have flowed from him far less - contributed to a deserved win. Jonathan Woodgate, another exile, was solid out of position at right-back, while Wilson Palacios, completing a quartet of those for whom White Hart Lane once held promise, proved in five minutes that there is something of Stoke in him too. " We like that effort and commitment and we don't like to have people outside of that group doing what they want to do," Pulis said.

It was Redknapp who had been ruminating on how the Europa League "just messes the whole week up" in a way which made it seem like elimination from the tournament this week would delight him, but the only side to reveal the merits of free Thursday nights were Stoke, fresh from a week of no European commitments, who made short work of opponents who had won six in a row and not lost in 11. They created more during their first-half supremacy than Tottenham did when – reshaped with a three-man defence and two wing-backs – they returned to pummel Stoke in an enervating second half.

The officials had an even more unconvincing second period than Stoke. First the referee Chris Foy awarded a penalty against Dean Whitehead when he appeared to have removed his foot as Luka Modric flew past him in the penalty area. Emmanuel Adebayor converted. A handball went undetected on the line, as Ryan Shawcross sought desperately to keep out a shot from Younes Kaboul. Then, when the ball was recycled for Adebayor to find the net, Pollock did not spot that Marc Wilson had just stepped back over the dead-ball line on to the field to play the striker onside. The goal was ruled offside. There was another borderline handball when Whitehead blocked Jermain Defoe's shot.

Kaboul made his feelings clear with a spectacle gesture, earned a booking, and after a soft challenge on Jon Walters soon found himself dismissed. Redknapp diced with an Football Association disciplinary hearing as he challenged all this. "When I saw [Chris Foy] from the start of the game I didn't think he was going to give us a lot today," the manager said. "I don't know why – I just had that feeling with him today. I just thought he was just enjoying not giving us anything. I never go to see referees after half-time– never in 30 years of refereeing, never – but today he has got it badly wrong."

It had been some turnaround. The Stoke fans like to sing of how "we'll play how we want" and the siege was certainly instantaneous, with the excellent 23-year-old Ryan Shotton launching a missile in the first minute which Benoit Assou-Ekotto's miscued head sent to the left foot of Etherington, of all places. Brad Friedel saved smartly.

But another routine had been worked on at Stoke's training ground, involving Shotton swinging in a cross from the right for Walters to head the ball into danger. Crouch seized it first time around, taking two very deft touches and holding off William Gallas to cut back for Etherington just as the ball seemed to be squirming out near Friedel's left post. He dispatched it imperiously. The precise same routine came 30 minutes later and though Crouch's deft incision came earlier – a well crafted flick sending Shotton racing down the right – Etherington again reacted first.

Pulis suggested that Tottenham could "push all the way to the Premiership this year" after his side weathered their second-half response. But Crouch looked like a man who could live without that title tilt. "It does make it more sweet," he said, articulating how it feels to flourish against a side who did not want him. "They are going to go very close this season but it's good to get a result."

Possession: Stoke 47% Tottenham 53%.

Attempts on target: Stoke 7 Tottenham 12.

Referee C Foy (Merseyside).

Attendance 27,529.

News
Jennifer Lawrence was among the stars allegedly hacked
peopleActress and 100 others on 'master list' after massive hack
Sport
Radamel Falcao
footballManchester United agree loan deal for Monaco striker Falcao
Sport
Louis van Gaal, Radamel Falcao, Arturo Vidal, Mats Hummels and Javier Hernandez
footballFalcao, Hernandez, Welbeck and every deal live as it happens
Sport
footballFeaturing Bart Simpson
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
Voices
A man shoots at targets depicting a portrait of Russian President Vladimir Putin, in a shooting range in the center of the western Ukrainian city of Lviv
voicesIt's cowardice to pretend this is anything other than an invasion
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand performs live
music Pro-independence show to take place four days before vote
Arts and Entertainment
booksNovelist takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Arts and Entertainment
The eyes have it: Kate Bush
music
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor