Germany manager Joachim Low leads chorus of incredulity at Real Madrid's decision to sell Mesut Ozil to Arsenal

The midfielder moved for £42.5m

Real Madrid's decision to sell Mesut Ozil to Arsenal has been labelled "incomprehensible" by the German player's national coach, Joachim Löw.

Ozil said the reason for his £42.5m move from the Spanish capital to north London was because Arsène Wenger showed more faith in him than the Real coach, Carlo Ancelotti.

Löw believes the playmaker will benefit from a change of scenery, but he could not resist joining Ozil's former Real team-mates Cristiano Ronaldo, Sergio Ramos and Sami Khedira in questioning why the club would sanction such a move.

"Many Real players like Sami Khedira or Cristiano Ronaldo are sad about the transfer," Löw said. "For me, it's incomprehensible that Real would sell one of their top scorers."

Khedira, a Germany team-mate of Ozil's, had earlier claimed the loss of his compatriot would be felt on a personal as well as professional level. He said: "Personally, I feel bad about Mesut's transfer. We are very, very good friends. His departure is a loss also from a sporting perspective. Mesut can make the difference."

Ronaldo was similarly disgruntled, as he was quoted as saying that Ozil was the one Real team-mate who excelled at creating chances for him. "The sale of Ozil is bad news for me," he is said to have told his Portugal team-mates this week. "He is the player who knows best my movements in front of goal. I am very unhappy about the sale."

Ramos, meanwhile, risked falling out of favour with his coach at the Bernabeu by saying if he was in charge, Ozil "would be one of the last who would go".

Ramos said: "I've always had a real 'feeling' with him, and it's a shame. He's a great footballer, unique. Everyone is free to choose the best for themselves, but if I were to decide what was happening at Madrid he would be one of the last to go. But he has decided, and the club too. We have a great team and I hope it will be a big year [for us]."

Löw believes Real's loss is Ozil's – and Arsenal's – gain. "Mesut is a sensitive player and he needs the faith from the club and the coach," said Löw.

"It seems that was no longer 100 per cent there at Real whereas Arsenal and their coach, Arsène Wenger, pulled out all the stops to get him.

"He has a top coach there and, with Lukas Podolski and Per Mertesacker, he has two German colleagues. Arsenal are a strong team who play technically high-quality football."

The transfer has not affected Ozil in his preparation for Germany's World Cup qualifier against Austria on Friday night, though, with Löw adding he "looks perfectly happy and satisfied. He is fully focused".

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