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Bradley Wiggins sets sights on new goal of two tour wins in one season

"I want to win the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de France behind it"

Bradley Wiggins will be up early on Tuesday morning. He has the school run to do before he gets back on the bike for what will be his first moments to himself since he capped a golden 2012 on Sunday night by becoming BBC Sports Personality of the Year.

It will give the 34-year-old time to reflect on an extraordinary summer that has seen him become the most recognised sportsman in this country but, Wiggins being Wiggins, it is what lies ahead that is more likely to occupy his thoughts as he disappears into the Cheshire countryside.

"You reset the goals," said Wiggins. "I'm still hungry to do other things, but I'm never going to top this. I don't mind accepting that."

He already has those goals in place and they are formidable ones – in cycling terms they would be greater than what he achieved in 2012. Wiggins wants to win the Giro d'Italia and then defend his Tour de France title.

But whether he will be in a position to do so depends on Dave Brailsford, who was also honoured on Sunday night, and Wiggins does not expect to discover if he will be given the nod by Team Sky's director to go for a second yellow jersey until as little as two days before the Tour begins.

With the 2013 route set to favour climbers, while the Giro leans more to Wiggins' obvious strengths, it has been widely presumed that Chris Froome, second in this year's Tour would be preferred to lead. Wiggins does not accept that.

"I always wanted to win a second Tour," he said. "I want to win the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de France behind it. It's a new challenge. People said it can't be done, winning two tours in one year – so let's have a go. We have got an incredible team. Chris can also win it. We will see who is in the best shape come July. Dave will make decision who we go for, it may be Chris, it may be me. Whoever it is we have a professional obligation [to follow instructions]. It is a great position to be in."

As Sunday night made clear, Wiggins' sport is in a great position in this country too, an unparalleled one in its history. "To be on there the year after Mark as well – three cyclists in five years, that's quite something for our sport," said Wiggins, pointing at the familiar Sports Personality trophy which has been won by himself, Mark Cavendish and Sir Chris Hoy in the last five years. "Cycling is booming at the moment," he added. "Let's just hope it continues because it's a great sport and this year has shown that. The champions we have are also incredibly normal people."

Wiggins was described as a "rock star" by Sebastian Coe on Sunday. It is not a description that he recognises. "No I'm not. I won the Tour de France," he said and laid his hand on the trophy. "Without this I'd still be me."

Stage winner: how the race was won

1 Bradley Wiggins 492,064 votes 30.25%

2 Jessica Ennis 372,765 22.92%

3 Andy Murray 230,444 14.17%

4 Mo Farah 131,327 8.07%

5 David Weir 114,633 7.05%

6 Ellie Simmonds 102,894 6.33%

7 Sir Chris Hoy 42,961 2.64%

8 Nicola Adams 35,560 2.19%

9 Ben Ainslie 35,373 2.17%

10 Rory McIlroy 29,729 1.83%

11 Katherine Grainger 28,606 1.76%

12 Sarah Storey 10,342 0.64%