Montgomerie battles to keep scandal at bay

In the morning he was apologising for "the hurt I have caused my family"; in the afternoon Colin Montgomerie was moving into contention for the Wales Open. Of all the bizarre days which have filled this Scot's career very few have rivalled the one witnessed yesterday.

The billing had said Montgomerie would be at the venue of the Ryder Cup checking out the Europeans who may or may not make his side in four months' time. As it proved he was here facing questions about the private-life confession he made in a national newspaper. For five hours on a Twenty Ten Course bathed in sunshine he was able to stall becoming still further submerged in yet another extra-marital scandal involving a high-profile golfer.

Smiling as if he did not have a care in the world, the 47-year-old shot a second successive 70 to stand on two-under, four off Marcel Siem and Andrew Dodt. As he said "it's been the first time I've been up there for a while". But the press corps inevitably wanted to focus on what it said in the Daily Mirror, not on the leaderboard.

"I've said everything I have to say," said Montgomerie, after initially refusing to talk about the story with Sky Sports. "The crowd were very supportive and it's up to Gaynor [Knowles, his wife] and I to work things out. That's what we are doing and we are looking forward to welcoming everybody here to Wales in October with a win." When asked if it would have an impact on his captaincy he replied: "No, not at all. Not one bit."

A little earlier Thomas Bjorn – in third on five-under – had effectively said the same in his role of chairman on the Players Committee. Why should it have any impact? Well, cynics will point out how Montgomerie has repeatedly stressed the importance of the wives at the Ryder Cup. Furthermore when commenting on Tiger Woods' own problems he pointed out how awkward the world No 1 may feel in this atmosphere. Montgomerie can only pray he does not come in for even a thousandth of the scrutiny that Woods has been under. Monty is not in Tiger's league fame-wise – but the timing is awful.

Inevitably the big man's predicament would overshadow the second round. But there were sporting storylines daring to divert a little of the attention. Luke Donald followed up a 75 with a 65 to move to two-under, so further cementing his reputation as the new comeback man of golf, having prevailed in Madrid on Sunday, a week after blowing the BMW PGA Championship.

While Donald was celebrating golf's topsy-turvy nature, it had left Paul Lawrie in utter despair. The 1999 Open champion was on four-under and in fourth when he came to his 10th hole (the second). On the par five in three, Lawrie managed to take eight putts before eventually signing up for an 11. In the space of a few minutes he had dropped 60 places and was heading home. "Ridiculous," said the Scot as he reflected on putting off the green twice into a hollow and taking a few more to get back up the hill. "Quite ridiculous." It summed up the day.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
Details of the self-cleaning coating were published last night in the journal Science
science
News
Approved Food sell products past their sell-by dates at discounted prices
i100
News
Life-changing: Simone de Beauvoir in 1947, two years before she wrote 'The Second Sex', credited as the starting point of second wave feminism
peopleHer seminal feminist polemic, The Second Sex, has been published in short-form to mark International Women's Day
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
The beat is on: Alfred Doda, Gjevat Kelmendi and Orli Shuka in ‘Hyena’
filmReview: Hyena takes corruption and sleaziness to a truly epic level
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
8 best workout DVDs

8 best workout DVDs

If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

Paul Scholes column

I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable