Tiger Woods versus Bob May: The final 12 holes that gripped golf

Both Tiger Woods and Bob May were 13 under par as they approached the back nine of the final round in the USPGA Championship at Valhalla on Sunday.

Both Tiger Woods and Bob May were 13 under par as they approached the back nine of the final round in the USPGA Championship at Valhalla on Sunday.

At the 551 yard 10th hole Woods opted for a three wood and hit a 294 yard drive before using a two iron from 257 yards from the hole.

May also used a three wood to hit 280 yards then used a one iron to approach the hole. Both players landed in the bunker and blasted out sand wedges to the side of the hole. Neither player missed with the first attempt to set the tone for 12 holes when the putter was king.

On the 168 yard 11th, May and Woods both used a nine iron from the tee. Woods landed in the bunker but once again managed to get up and down with another superbly executed sand shot. May's tee shot hit the green and he held the putt to take a one shot lead.

At the 12th May used the driver and hit the fairway whereas Woods chose a one iron for the 467 yard hole. May then took an eight iron for his 181 yard approach whereas Woods opted for a nine iron from 176 yards. Both found the green and cozed in difficult putts for birdies.

At the 13th with May still one ahead the unheralded American used a three wood whereas Woods again went with a one iron. Both landed around 90 yards from the hole and chose pitching wedges to hit in. Both putted at the first attempt. Advantage still with May.

On the 217 yard 14th May used a two iron to hit straight to the green and Woods plays a four iron with the same result. Both players putt to achieve birdies at the par three hole.

On the 15th May teed off with a driver and Woods with a three wood. May used a seven iron to hit 168 yards to the side of the hole. Woods chooses an eight iron for a 164 yard shot but misses the green on the left.

Woods holes a tricky 10-footer for par before May misses an easy putt to extend his one-shot lead.

On the 16th hole, with May one shot ahead May hooks a driver into the rough on the left. Woods opts for a two iron for the 442 yard hole and finds the middle of the fairway.

May threads his way through the trees with an seven iron from 183 yards to somehow find the green while Woods hits an eight iron over the flag to the back of the green. Both two-putt.

On the 422 yard 17th hole, May again pulls his drive. Woods conjures the his longest drive of the week, hitting the ball 326 yards. May hits the green with an eight iron from 171 yards whereas Woods uses a lob wedge from 96 yards. May takes two putts on the green but Woods manages a birdie to leave the match all square, both at 17 under. On the par-five 542-yard 18th, Woods hit a 302 yard drive with his three wood whereas May again opts for a driver. May finds the fairway and uses a three wood for his 266 yard shot to the front left of the green. Woods goes for the flag with a two from 246 yards but ends up in a gulley on the right half of the green.

May putts too firmly to 15 feet wheras Woods takes the wrong line but is only six feet away. May holes his tricky downhill putt and Woods, knowing that a miss will give May the title, rolls in his six-footer to force a play-off.

The pair went back to the 16th hole for the first play-off hole. Woods hit with a one iron while May chose a three wood. For his second shot of 201 yards, May chose a seven iron and Woods chose the same club for his197 yard shot. May needed a pitching wedge and left himself inches from the hole but Woods downed a difficult putt for a birdie three.

On the second play-off hole at the 17th Woods used a driver but slipped well off the fairway. May also used a driver but ended on the outskirts of a bunker. Woods chose a pitching wedge from 123 yards whereas May used a nine iron from 155 yards from the hole.

Woods opted for a putter and left himself within inches of the hole on his third shot. May chose a sand wedge and got closer than Woods both players putted for par.

On the final hole Woods teed off on the 542 yard hole using a three wood whereas May opted for a driver again. Woods got himself out of trouble using an iron whereas May chose a three iron and landed to the right of the hole. Woods was 150 yards from the hole and chose a pitching wedge but landed in the bunker. May chose a nine iron and just hit the green. An excellent bunker shot using a sand wedge saw Woods land inches from the hole, and May needed to successfully putt but missed by an inch.

Woods holes out to make history.

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