Sir Chris Hoy and Laura Trott ensure another golden night for Team GB as velodrome action ends

 

Sir Chris Hoy and Laura Trott won their second gold medals of the London 2012 Olympics as Great Britain equalled their Beijing track cycle bounty of seven wins from 10 events - but there was no golden goodbye for Victoria Pendleton.

Hoy won the final event of the London track programme with a stunning triumph in the men's keirin, while Trott won the women's omnium as the duo became double gold medal winners in London.

But Pendleton was denied a final flourish as perennial rival Anna Meares of Australia claimed sprint gold with a dramatic 2-0 win over the Briton.

Hoy does not expect to be in Rio in 2016 but admits the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow in 2014 would be a "dream ending".

He told BBC1: "I'm 99.9% sure I won't be competing there in Rio.

"How can you top this? This is phenomenal.

"Glasgow? That's another question.

"If I can keep going to Glasgow that would be a dream ending for me but when you get to my age you can't look too far ahead, you have to focus on the here and now."

On his keirin victory, he said: "I'm in shock. You try to compose yourself and try to be able to take it all in but this surreal.

"This is what I always wanted. I wanted to win gold in front of my home crowd.

"I've done the team sprint, I saw Jason (Kenny), the team pursuit girls, the team pursuit boys, everyone stepping up to the plate, Laura (Trott) today, and I just wanted to do my bit for the team as well.

"Thankfully it worked out."

Hoy took his Olympic gold medal-winning tally to five - level with Sir Steve Redgrave - on Thursday with victory in the team sprint and won the keirin in trademark fashion to send a partisan crowd into raptures.

Hoy now has seven Olympic medals in all, drawing level with four-time champion Bradley Wiggins as the most successful Briton.

An emotional Hoy wiped tears from his eyes as he received his medal as the capacity velodrome sung along to the national anthem, hailing his achievement.

Germany's Maximilian Levy was second, while two bronze medals were awarded as Simon van Velthooven of New Zealand and Teun Mulder of Holland could not be separated by officials scrutinising the photo finish.

Hoy was third behind the motorised Derny and appeared boxed in as Awang Azizulhasni made his move just before the pace-setting bike left the track.

The Scot swiftly found a gap and eased to the front of the six-man final group before turning on the power in the final lap and into the final bend to triumph on the Olympic stage once more and successfully defend the title he won in 2008.

Hoy won one-kilometre time-trial gold in Athens eight years ago and triple Olympic gold in Beijing four years later and was received by all members of the British coaching staff as he said goodbye to the Olympic stage for a final time.

The successes saw Britain take their tally to eight cycling gold medals - equalling their Beijing haul - two silvers and a bronze, with BMX and mountain bike to come.

The velodrome was the day's hot ticket, with everyone from London 2012 chief Sebastian Coe and Prince Harry to NBA basketball star Kobe Bryant in attendance, anticipating success for Hoy and Pendleton on their final Olympic appearances. But first it was Trott's turn.

The 20-year-old from Cheshunt won team pursuit gold on Saturday but has now won an individual title to join an elite club of British females to have won double gold at a single Games, including Dame Kelly Holmes and swimmer Rebecca Adlington.

She said: "Not many 20-year-olds can say they have two gold medals.

"I don't think people talk about me in the same sense as them. I just can't believe it."

The Duke of Cambridge was among those keen to congratulate Britain's cyclists on their success.

Trott was stunned on hearing she might meet Prince William, saying: "No - he's not."

Trott won Track Cycling World Championships gold in each event and now has double Olympic gold too.

Sarah Hammer of the United States was second, with Annette Edmondson of Australia third.

The victory was sealed with a win in the final event, the 500metres time-trial.

Trott added: "It's mad. I can't believe it. I had such a good day yesterday and came out with the lowest points I could have hoped for, my training paid off.

"But today I didn't actually have that great a day. I was disappointed to finish second in the IP (individual pursuit).

"I thought I might win the IP as my training's been going so well. And then I ballsed the scratch race up as well didn't I?

"All I had to do was roll her and I didn't. I thought 'it's all down to the 500m now'. I was so nervous and I don't get nervous for the 500.

"I know I'm good at 500s, I know that sounds too confident but I am. But three places? You don't put three places on Sarah Hammer very easily. She's the strongest rider out there.

"I thought how am I going to do this? I thought I was going to be sick on the start line, which didn't help matters. But I just got going and the crowd just drove me home. I was so happy.

"I was so nervous last night I couldn't sleep. Every emotion was going through my head.

"All I kept thinking was 'I just want to celebrate with my family'."

Trott did just that after drawing level with Pendleton on two Olympic golds.

Moments later Pendleton missed out on moving ahead of her team-mate.

It was written in the script that Pendleton would meet Meares in the final, a repeat of the 2008 gold medal showdown won by the Briton, and there were tears and drama, but there was ultimately no third Olympic gold for the retiring 31-year-old.

Pendleton was relegated by officials for leaving the sprinting lane in the first bout of the best-of-three contest.

Pendleton had to respond in the second bout to force a decider and Meares was in front first, watching her opponent.

Meares came to a near halt at the end of the first of three laps, forcing Pendleton to the front.

The Australian rounded Pendleton on the outside and the Briton could not respond as Meares celebrated before the line by punching the air.

It ended hopes of a fairytale conclusion to Pendleton's sensational career and saw Meares take revenge for Beijing.

China's Guo Shuang won bronze with a 2-0 defeat of Kristina Vogel of Germany.

Hoy was joined on the track by Redgrave, who gave the Scot a hug.

"That's me done for the Olympics," Hoy said to Redgrave.

Hoy said Redgrave was an inspiration, adding: "To me he will always be the greatest no matter how many medals you win.

"To be here and have Steve congratulate me is incredible."

When asked about his tears on the podium, Hoy told the BBC: "I could not hold it in. I think it's when you realise how many things have not gone so well and you have doubted yourself and you take nothing for granted. In sport nothing is assured.

"I was going to celebrate any medal.

"It's just been the most unbelievable experience of my life."

PA

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