Racing: Mutafaweq will be back for more

ONE OF the more moronic platitudes on the turf is that the racehorse is the best looked-after animal around. This ignores the notion that old horsey in his natural state, on the Steppes for example, does not squash himself into a small box for 22 hours a day. It also disregards the fact that the pampered prisoner has to sing pretty hard for his cereal supper every now and again.

Nobody who saw Mutafaweq looking as though he was about to pass into another world after Saturday's 223rd St Leger would have recognised his as a poodle's profession. The unsteady winner had almost run himself to death. Mutafaweq was recovering yesterday from the traumas of dehydration and an injury to his rear quarters. His Godolphin masters have signed him off for this season but expect him to return next. They hope he suffers from amnesia. "It was a worrying time for everybody, but the horse is okay," Simon Crisford, the Godolphin racing manager, said yesterday. "It was a reaction to a hard run. Let's hope it doesn't leave any mental scars."

The Turkish bath that was Town Moor on Saturday had an early effect on Mutafaweq. He emerged on to the racecourse stained with sweat, his nostrils flaring with excitement. The colt was flat out for the final three furlongs of his assignment and then almost flat out on the Yorkshire grass as exertions took their toll. In the winners' enclosure he reared, bucked and flashed his tail. He lashed out as if stung by a hornet as it became clear to connections that something was badly wrong. "When you see a horse in acute distress like that you begin to wonder if a major catastrophe has happened internally," one vet who treated Mutafaweq said. The horse veered between wild spasm and near collapse until he was returned to the pre-parade ring. There he was hosed down and daubed with sponges before being led into the intensive-care unit of the veterinary treatment box. Buckets of water were relayed into the unit. An emergency drip was strapped round a beam and fed into Mutafaweq's jugular vein. It was a miserable reward for a brave animal.

"The horse seems to have suffered from heatstroke and post-race exhaustion," the vet said. "He was very dehydrated and he probably had a tremendous increase in his inner temperature which caused the unco-ordination and discomfort. "It's a condition we see not infrequently on the racetrack, particularly when you have got a long, fast race on a muggy day without any airflow. It's a condition you see fairly frequently in California and Florida. Some horses there they spray with alcohol, which causes evaporation and they cool pretty quickly, and they always have buckets of iced water to hand. It happens more often with dark-coloured horses because they absorb the heat more. He [Mutafaweq] had an intravenous drip, 10 litres of a glucose saline solution. He had a sedative to settle him down, anti- inflammatory to speed recovery and painkillers to make him more comfortable behind. He's had a real cocktail. He's run his heart out basically."

When Mutafaweq eventually did emerge, at 4.40, almost exactly an hour after the sports, he still appeared shattered, his head bowed like a worshipper's. His eyes were half closed and he was drifting around on medication. Peace at last.

By then though the colt was no longer Godolphin's most recent Group One winner. That title was usurped by Daylami, who did not have to flay himself so much in Leopardstown's Champion Stakes. That made it 14 Group Ones this year for Team Dubai, one better that in 1995 and the year of Lammtarra. It was not, however, a long party. "We're pleased but we're not going to dwell on it," Crisford said. "We put a lot of pressure on ourselves at the beginning of each season and so we should. We get handed this raw material of premium quality and anything less than we have achieved could be deemed to be unsatisfactory."

And Godolphin had to make do with that. Group One race No 15 was denied at Longchamp yesterday when Etizaaz, the team's main runner in the Prix Vermeille at Longchamp, was beaten by Daryaba. The winner runs in the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, as do two other winners on yesterday's card. El Condor Pasa, the Japan Cup winner, is third favourite following his success in the Prix Foy. He has ahead of him Daylami, a top-priced 11- 4 with the Tote even though the Arc has yet to be confirmed as a target, and yesterday's Prix Niel winner, Montjeu.

The Niel has produced the last three Arc winners in Sagamix, Peintre Celebre and Helissio, but Montjeu was eased in the betting after his subdued victory from Peter Chapple-Hyam's Bienamado. "He was a little uptight today but that was to be expected," John Hammond, the winning trainer, said. "He's coming off a lay-off, he hasn't run for 10 weeks and I think he needed the run today, mentally as well as physically. We're happy that today has gone the right way, and we'll take the Arc as it comes."

LONGCHAMP

2.10: (1m 4f Prix Foy) 1. EL CONDOR PASA (M Ebina); 2. Borgia; 3 Croco Rouge. 3 ran. Sh-nk, 1/2. (Y Ninomiya) Pari-Mutuel: 1.30. NR: Sagamix.

3.15: (1m 4f Prix Vermeille) 1. DARYABA (G Mosse); 2. Etizaaz; 3. Cerulean Sky. 11 ran. 21/2. (A de Royer Dupre). Pari Mutuel: 1.80; 1.60, 2.30, 3.60.

3.45: (1m 4f Prix Niel) 1. MONTJEU (M J Kinane); 2. Bienamado; 3. First Magnitude. 4 ran. Hd. (J E Hammond). Pari-Mutuel: 1.10; 1.10, 1.00.

ARC BETTING: William Hill: 7-4 (with a run) Daylami, 2-1 Montjeu, 7-2 El Condor Pasa, 12-1 Daryaba, 14-1 others. Ladbrokes: 7-4 Daylami, 5-2 Montjeu, 9-2 El Condor Pasa, 10-1 Daryaba, Tiger Hill, 16-1 others. Tote: 7-4 Montjeu, 11-4 Daylami, 9-2 El Condor Pasa, 10-1 Adair, 16-1 others.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Ben Stiller as Derek Zoolander in the leaked trailer for Zoolander 2
film
Sport
footballArsenal take the Community Shield thanks to a sensational strike from Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain
Arts and Entertainment
Gemma Chan as synth Anita in Humans
film
News
Keeping it friendly: Tom Cruise on ‘The Daily Show’ with Jon Stewart
people
Arts and Entertainment
Ensemble cast: Jamie McCartney with ‘The Great Wall of Vagina’
artBritish artist Jamie McCartney explains a work that is designed to put women's minds at rest
News
Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump
people
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: IT Support Engineer

£18000 - £26000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an opportunity for an I...

Recruitment Genius: Project Assistant

£17000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: They are a leading company in the field ...

Recruitment Genius: DBA Developer - SQL Server

£30000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Office Manager

£26041 - £34876 per annum: Recruitment Genius: There has never been a more exc...

Day In a Page

Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen